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Items: 1 to 20 of 22

1.

Small-Scale Die-Offs in Woodrats Support Long-Term Maintenance of Plague in the U.S. Southwest.

Kosoy M, Reynolds P, Bai Y, Sheff K, Enscore RE, Montenieri J, Ettestad P, Gage K.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2017 Sep;17(9):635-644. doi: 10.1089/vbz.2017.2142. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

2.

Zoonoses As Ecological Entities: A Case Review of Plague.

Zeppelini CG, de Almeida AM, Cordeiro-Estrela P.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2016 Oct 6;10(10):e0004949. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004949. eCollection 2016 Oct. Review.

3.

Plague in Iran: its history and current status.

Hashemi Shahraki A, Carniel E, Mostafavi E.

Epidemiol Health. 2016 Jul 24;38:e2016033. eCollection 2016. Review.

4.

Mathematical models to characterize early epidemic growth: A review.

Chowell G, Sattenspiel L, Bansal S, Viboud C.

Phys Life Rev. 2016 Sep;18:66-97. doi: 10.1016/j.plrev.2016.07.005. Epub 2016 Jul 11. Review.

5.

Galapagos III World Evolution Summit: why evolution matters.

Paz-Y-Miño-C G, Espinosa A.

Evolution (N Y). 2013;6. pii: 28. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

6.

Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Reveal Spatial Diversity Among Clones of Yersinia pestis During Plague Outbreaks in Colorado and the Western United States.

Lowell JL, Antolin MF, Andersen GL, Hu P, Stokowski RP, Gage KL.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2015 May;15(5):291-302. doi: 10.1089/vbz.2014.1714.

7.

Effects of land use on plague (Yersinia pestis) activity in rodents in Tanzania.

McCauley DJ, Salkeld DJ, Young HS, Makundi R, Dirzo R, Eckerlin RP, Lambin EF, Gaffikin L, Barry M, Helgen KM.

Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Apr;92(4):776-83. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.14-0504. Epub 2015 Feb 23.

8.

Seasonal fluctuations of small mammal and flea communities in a Ugandan plague focus: evidence to implicate Arvicanthis niloticus and Crocidura spp. as key hosts in Yersinia pestis transmission.

Moore SM, Monaghan A, Borchert JN, Mpanga JT, Atiku LA, Boegler KA, Montenieri J, MacMillan K, Gage KL, Eisen RJ.

Parasit Vectors. 2015 Jan 8;8:11. doi: 10.1186/s13071-014-0616-1.

9.

Costs and benefits of group living with disease: a case study of pneumonia in bighorn lambs (Ovis canadensis).

Manlove KR, Cassirer EF, Cross PC, Plowright RK, Hudson PJ.

Proc Biol Sci. 2014 Dec 22;281(1797). pii: 20142331. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.2331.

10.

Host resistance, population structure and the long-term persistence of bubonic plague: contributions of a modelling approach in the Malagasy focus.

Gascuel F, Choisy M, Duplantier JM, Débarre F, Brouat C.

PLoS Comput Biol. 2013;9(5):e1003039. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003039. Epub 2013 May 9.

11.

Epidemiological effects of group size variation in social species.

Caillaud D, Craft ME, Meyers LA.

J R Soc Interface. 2013 Apr 10;10(83):20130206. doi: 10.1098/rsif.2013.0206. Print 2013 Jun 6.

12.

Improvement of disease prediction and modeling through the use of meteorological ensembles: human plague in Uganda.

Moore SM, Monaghan A, Griffith KS, Apangu T, Mead PS, Eisen RJ.

PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e44431. Epub 2012 Sep 14.

13.

Model-guided fieldwork: practical guidelines for multidisciplinary research on wildlife ecological and epidemiological dynamics.

Restif O, Hayman DT, Pulliam JR, Plowright RK, George DB, Luis AD, Cunningham AA, Bowen RA, Fooks AR, O'Shea TJ, Wood JL, Webb CT.

Ecol Lett. 2012 Oct;15(10):1083-94. doi: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01836.x. Epub 2012 Jul 19.

14.

Impact of external sources of infection on the dynamics of bovine tuberculosis in modelled badger populations.

Hardstaff JL, Bulling MT, Marion G, Hutchings MR, White PC.

BMC Vet Res. 2012 Jun 27;8:92. doi: 10.1186/1746-6148-8-92.

15.

The effect of heterogeneity on invasion in spatial epidemics: from theory to experimental evidence in a model system.

Neri FM, Bates A, Füchtbauer WS, Pérez-Reche FJ, Taraskin SN, Otten W, Bailey DJ, Gilligan CA.

PLoS Comput Biol. 2011 Sep;7(9):e1002174. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002174. Epub 2011 Sep 29.

16.

Dynamics of the plague-wildlife-human system in Central Asia are controlled by two epidemiological thresholds.

Samia NI, Kausrud KL, Heesterbeek H, Ageyev V, Begon M, Chan KS, Stenseth NC.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Aug 30;108(35):14527-32. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1015946108. Epub 2011 Aug 19.

17.

Decelerating spread of West Nile virus by percolation in a heterogeneous urban landscape.

Magori K, Bajwa WI, Bowden S, Drake JM.

PLoS Comput Biol. 2011 Jul;7(7):e1002104. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002104. Epub 2011 Jul 28.

18.

Transmission shifts underlie variability in population responses to Yersinia pestis infection.

Buhnerkempe MG, Eisen RJ, Goodell B, Gage KL, Antolin MF, Webb CT.

PLoS One. 2011;6(7):e22498. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0022498. Epub 2011 Jul 25.

19.

Network models: an underutilized tool in wildlife epidemiology?

Craft ME, Caillaud D.

Interdiscip Perspect Infect Dis. 2011;2011:676949. doi: 10.1155/2011/676949. Epub 2011 Mar 10.

20.

Predictors for abundance of host flea and floor flea in households of villages with endemic commensal rodent plague, Yunnan Province, China.

Yin JX, Geater A, Chongsuvivatwong V, Dong XQ, Du CH, Zhong YH.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2011 Mar 29;5(3):e997. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000997.

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