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Items: 1 to 20 of 97

1.

Schizophrenia Shows Disrupted Links between Brain Volume and Dynamic Functional Connectivity.

Abrol A, Rashid B, Rachakonda S, Damaraju E, Calhoun VD.

Front Neurosci. 2017 Nov 7;11:624. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2017.00624. eCollection 2017.

2.

Identifying functional network changing patterns in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis and patients with early illness schizophrenia: A group ICA study.

Du Y, Fryer SL, Lin D, Sui J, Yu Q, Chen J, Stuart B, Loewy RL, Calhoun VD, Mathalon DH.

Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Oct 19;17:335-346. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.10.018. eCollection 2018.

3.

Ten Key Observations on the Analysis of Resting-state Functional MR Imaging Data Using Independent Component Analysis.

Calhoun VD, de Lacy N.

Neuroimaging Clin N Am. 2017 Nov;27(4):561-579. doi: 10.1016/j.nic.2017.06.012. Epub 2017 Aug 18. Review.

PMID:
28985929
4.

Remodeling of Sensorimotor Brain Connectivity in Gpr88-Deficient Mice.

Arefin TM, Mechling AE, Meirsman AC, Bienert T, Hübner NS, Lee HL, Ben Hamida S, Ehrlich A, Roquet D, Hennig J, von Elverfeldt D, Kieffer BL, Harsan LA.

Brain Connect. 2017 Oct;7(8):526-540. doi: 10.1089/brain.2017.0486.

PMID:
28882062
5.

The Role of Intrinsic Brain Functional Connectivity in Vulnerability and Resilience to Bipolar Disorder.

Doucet GE, Bassett DS, Yao N, Glahn DC, Frangou S.

Am J Psychiatry. 2017 Dec 1;174(12):1214-1222. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17010095. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

PMID:
28817956
6.

Regular cannabis and alcohol use is associated with resting-state time course power spectra in incarcerated adolescents.

Thijssen S, Rashid B, Gopal S, Nyalakanti P, Calhoun VD, Kiehl KA.

Drug Alcohol Depend. 2017 Sep 1;178:492-500. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.05.045. Epub 2017 Jul 8.

PMID:
28715777
7.

A case for motor network contributions to schizophrenia symptoms: Evidence from resting-state connectivity.

Bernard JA, Goen JRM, Maldonado T.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 Sep;38(9):4535-4545. doi: 10.1002/hbm.23680. Epub 2017 Jun 12.

PMID:
28603856
8.

Brain structure, function, and neurochemistry in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder-a systematic review of the magnetic resonance neuroimaging literature.

Birur B, Kraguljac NV, Shelton RC, Lahti AC.

NPJ Schizophr. 2017 Apr 3;3:15. doi: 10.1038/s41537-017-0013-9. eCollection 2017.

9.

Effects of risk for bipolar disorder on brain function: A twin and family study.

Sugihara G, Kane F, Picchioni MM, Chaddock CA, Kravariti E, Kalidindi S, Rijsdijk F, Toulopoulou T, Curtis VA, McDonald C, Murray RM, McGuire P.

Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2017 May;27(5):494-503. doi: 10.1016/j.euroneuro.2017.03.001. Epub 2017 Apr 6.

10.

Alterations of Intrinsic Brain Connectivity Patterns in Depression and Bipolar Disorders: A Critical Assessment of Magnetoencephalography-Based Evidence.

Alamian G, Hincapié AS, Combrisson E, Thiery T, Martel V, Althukov D, Jerbi K.

Front Psychiatry. 2017 Mar 17;8:41. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2017.00041. eCollection 2017. Review.

11.

Default mode functional connectivity is associated with social functioning in schizophrenia.

Fox JM, Abram SV, Reilly JL, Eack S, Goldman MB, Csernansky JG, Wang L, Smith MJ.

J Abnorm Psychol. 2017 May;126(4):392-405. doi: 10.1037/abn0000253. Epub 2017 Mar 30.

PMID:
28358526
12.

Hyperactivity of the default-mode network in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia at rest revealed by family-based case-control and traditional case-control designs.

Guo W, Liu F, Chen J, Wu R, Li L, Zhang Z, Chen H, Zhao J.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2017 Mar;96(13):e6223. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000006223.

13.

Using Dual Regression to Investigate Network Shape and Amplitude in Functional Connectivity Analyses.

Nickerson LD, Smith SM, Öngür D, Beckmann CF.

Front Neurosci. 2017 Mar 13;11:115. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2017.00115. eCollection 2017.

14.

Reentrant Information Flow in Electrophysiological Rat Default Mode Network.

Jing W, Guo D, Zhang Y, Guo F, Valdés-Sosa PA, Xia Y, Yao D.

Front Neurosci. 2017 Feb 27;11:93. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2017.00093. eCollection 2017.

15.

Polygenic risk for five psychiatric disorders and cross-disorder and disorder-specific neural connectivity in two independent populations.

Wang T, Zhang X, Li A, Zhu M, Liu S, Qin W, Li J, Yu C, Jiang T, Liu B.

Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Feb 13;14:441-449. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.02.011. eCollection 2017.

16.

Dynamic functional connectivity in bipolar disorder is associated with executive function and processing speed: A preliminary study.

Nguyen TT, Kovacevic S, Dev SI, Lu K, Liu TT, Eyler LT.

Neuropsychology. 2017 Jan;31(1):73-83. doi: 10.1037/neu0000317. Epub 2016 Oct 24.

PMID:
27775400
17.

ACC Neuro-over-Connectivity Is Associated with Mathematically Modeled Additional Encoding Operations of Schizophrenia Stroop-Task Performance.

Taylor R, Théberge J, Williamson PC, Densmore M, Neufeld RW.

Front Psychol. 2016 Sep 16;7:1295. eCollection 2016.

18.

The Significance of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: A Review.

Mohan A, Roberto AJ, Mohan A, Lorenzo A, Jones K, Carney MJ, Liogier-Weyback L, Hwang S, Lapidus KA.

Yale J Biol Med. 2016 Mar 24;89(1):49-57. eCollection 2016 Mar. Review.

19.

Commonalities in EEG Spectral Power Abnormalities Between Women With ADHD and Women With Bipolar Disorder During Rest and Cognitive Performance.

Rommel AS, Kitsune GL, Michelini G, Hosang GM, Asherson P, McLoughlin G, Brandeis D, Kuntsi J.

Brain Topogr. 2016 Nov;29(6):856-866. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

20.

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