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Items: 1 to 20 of 220

1.

Alterations in visual cortical activation and connectivity with prefrontal cortex during working memory updating in major depressive disorder.

Le TM, Borghi JA, Kujawa AJ, Klein DN, Leung HC.

Neuroimage Clin. 2017 Jan 7;14:43-53. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2017.01.004.

2.

Attention bias in older women with remitted depression is associated with enhanced amygdala activity and functional connectivity.

Albert K, Gau V, Taylor WD, Newhouse PA.

J Affect Disord. 2017 Mar 1;210:49-56. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2016.12.010.

PMID:
28012352
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Anticipatory and consummatory pleasure and displeasure in major depressive disorder: An experience sampling study.

Wu H, Mata J, Furman DJ, Whitmer AJ, Gotlib IH, Thompson RJ.

J Abnorm Psychol. 2017 Feb;126(2):149-159. doi: 10.1037/abn0000244.

PMID:
27936838
6.

The Effect of Emotion and Reward Contingencies on Relational Memory in Major Depression: An Eye-Movement Study with Follow-Up.

Nemeth VL, Csete G, Drotos G, Greminger N, Janka Z, Vecsei L, Must A.

Front Psychol. 2016 Nov 22;7:1849.

7.

Cognitive Remediation and Bias Modification Strategies in Mood and Anxiety Disorders.

Gold AK, Montana RE, Sylvia LG, Nierenberg AA, Deckersbach T.

Curr Behav Neurosci Rep. 2016 Dec;3(4):340-349.

PMID:
27917364
8.

Seeing light at the end of the tunnel: Positive prospective mental imagery and optimism in depression.

Ji JL, Holmes EA, Blackwell SE.

Psychiatry Res. 2017 Jan;247:155-162. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.11.025.

9.

Neural correlates underlying impaired memory facilitation and suppression of negative material in depression.

Zhang D, Xie H, Liu Y, Luo Y.

Sci Rep. 2016 Nov 18;6:37556. doi: 10.1038/srep37556.

11.

Acute stress impairs frontocingulate activation during error monitoring in remitted depression.

Whitton AE, Van't Veer A, Kakani P, Dillon DG, Ironside ML, Haile A, Crowley DJ, Pizzagalli DA.

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2017 Jan;75:164-172. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.10.007.

PMID:
27835807
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13.

Cognitive Bias in Ambiguity Judgements: Using Computational Models to Dissect the Effects of Mild Mood Manipulation in Humans.

Iigaya K, Jolivald A, Jitkrittum W, Gilchrist ID, Dayan P, Paul E, Mendl M.

PLoS One. 2016 Nov 9;11(11):e0165840. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0165840.

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Understanding comorbidity among internalizing problems: Integrating latent structural models of psychopathology and risk mechanisms.

Hankin BL, Snyder HR, Gulley LD, Schweizer TH, Bijttebier P, Nelis S, Toh G, Vasey MW.

Dev Psychopathol. 2016 Nov;28(4pt1):987-1012.

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A Novel Interaction between Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) Gene Polymorphism (rs4570625) and BDNF Val66Met Predicts a High-Risk Emotional Phenotype in Healthy Subjects.

Latsko MS, Gilman TL, Matt LM, Nylocks KM, Coifman KG, Jasnow AM.

PLoS One. 2016 Oct 3;11(10):e0162585. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0162585.

19.

Can't Look Away: An Eye-Tracking Based Attentional Disengagement Training for Depression.

Ferrari GR, Möbius M, van Opdorp A, Becker ES, Rinck M.

Cognit Ther Res. 2016;40(5):672-686.

20.

Attentional biases in children of depressed mothers: An event-related potential (ERP) study.

Gibb BE, Pollak SD, Hajcak G, Owens M.

J Abnorm Psychol. 2016 Nov;125(8):1166-1178.

PMID:
27684964
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