Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 36

1.

Scarce information about breast cancer screening: An Italian websites analysis.

Attena F, Cancellieri M, Pelullo CP.

Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Dec;95(50):e5615.

2.

Mammography decision making: Trends and predictors of provider communication in the Health Information National Trends Survey, 2011 to 2014.

Spring LM, Marshall MR, Warner ET.

Cancer. 2017 Feb 1;123(3):401-409. doi: 10.1002/cncr.30378.

PMID:
27727457
3.

Informed Choice in the German Mammography Screening Program by Education and Migrant Status: Survey among First-Time Invitees.

Berens EM, Reder M, Razum O, Kolip P, Spallek J.

PLoS One. 2015 Nov 3;10(11):e0142316. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0142316.

4.

Doctor, what does my positive test mean? From Bayesian textbook tasks to personalized risk communication.

Navarrete G, Correia R, Sirota M, Juanchich M, Huepe D.

Front Psychol. 2015 Sep 17;6:1327. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01327.

5.

Using an informed consent in mammography screening: a randomized trial.

Baena-Cañada JM, Rosado-Varela P, Expósito-Álvarez I, González-Guerrero M, Nieto-Vera J, Benítez-Rodríguez E.

Cancer Med. 2015 Dec;4(12):1923-32. doi: 10.1002/cam4.525.

6.

Preconceptions influence women's perceptions of information on breast cancer screening: a qualitative study.

Henriksen MJ, Guassora AD, Brodersen J.

BMC Res Notes. 2015 Sep 3;8:404. doi: 10.1186/s13104-015-1327-1.

8.

On the Supposed Evidence for Libertarian Paternalism.

Gigerenzer G.

Rev Philos Psychol. 2015;6(3):361-383.

9.

Does a decision aid improve informed choice in mammography screening? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Reder M, Kolip P.

BMC Womens Health. 2015 Jul 22;15:53. doi: 10.1186/s12905-015-0210-5.

10.

Decisional outcomes following use of an interactive web-based decision aid for prostate cancer screening.

Tomko C, Davis K, Ludin S, Kelly S, Stern A, Luta G, Taylor KL.

Transl Behav Med. 2015 Jun;5(2):189-97. doi: 10.1007/s13142-014-0301-0.

11.
12.

Impact of a printed decision aid on patients' intention to undergo prostate cancer screening: a multicentre, pragmatic randomised controlled trial in primary care.

Tran VT, Kisseleva-Romanova E, Rigal L, Falcoff H.

Br J Gen Pract. 2015 May;65(634):e295-304. doi: 10.3399/bjgp15X684817.

13.
14.

Baseline Attitudes About Prostate Cancer Screening Moderate the Impact of Decision Aids on Screening Rates.

Starosta AJ, Luta G, Tomko CA, Schwartz MD, Taylor KL.

Ann Behav Med. 2015 Oct;49(5):762-8. doi: 10.1007/s12160-015-9692-5.

15.

Effect of providing risk information on undergoing cervical cancer screening: a randomized controlled trial.

Fujiwara H, Shimoda A, Ishikawa Y, Taneichi A, Ohashi M, Takahashi Y, Koyanagi T, Morisawa H, Takahashi S, Sato N, Machida S, Takei Y, Saga Y, Suzuki M.

Arch Public Health. 2015 Feb 23;73(1):7. doi: 10.1186/s13690-014-0055-7.

16.

Putting public health ethics into practice: a systematic framework.

Marckmann G, Schmidt H, Sofaer N, Strech D.

Front Public Health. 2015 Feb 6;3:23. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2015.00023.

17.

Social network effects of nonlifesaving early-stage breast cancer detection on mammography rates.

Nowak SA, Parker AM.

Am J Public Health. 2014 Dec;104(12):2439-44. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2014.302153.

18.

A cross-sectional study on informed choice in the mammography screening programme in Germany (InEMa): a study protocol.

Berens EM, Reder M, Kolip P, Spallek J.

BMJ Open. 2014 Sep 17;4(9):e006145. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006145.

19.

Intermittent attendance at breast cancer screening.

Fleming P, O'Neill S, Owens M, Mooney T, Fitzpatrick P.

J Public Health Res. 2013 Sep 5;2(2):e14. doi: 10.4081/jphr.2013.e14.

20.

Statistical illiteracy in residents: what they do not learn today will hurt their patients tomorrow.

Wegwarth O.

J Grad Med Educ. 2013 Jun;5(2):340-1. doi: 10.4300/JGME-D-13-00084.1. No abstract available.

Supplemental Content

Support Center