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Items: 11

1.

Signals, cues and the nature of mimicry.

Jamie GA.

Proc Biol Sci. 2017 Feb 22;284(1849). pii: 20162080. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2016.2080. Review.

2.

Multi-trait mimicry of ants by a parasitoid wasp.

Malcicka M, Bezemer TM, Visser B, Bloemberg M, Snart CJ, Hardy IC, Harvey JA.

Sci Rep. 2015 Jan 27;5:8043. doi: 10.1038/srep08043.

3.

A COGNITIVE PERSPECTIVE ON AGGRESSIVE MIMICRY.

Jackson RR, Cross FR.

J Zool (1987). 2013 Jul 1;290(3):161-171.

4.

Seeing orange: prawns tap into a pre-existing sensory bias of the Trinidadian guppy.

De Serrano AR, Weadick CJ, Price AC, Rodd FH.

Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Aug 22;279(1741):3321-8. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.0633. Epub 2012 May 16.

5.

Tangled in a sparse spider web: single origin of orb weavers and their spinning work unravelled by denser taxonomic sampling.

Dimitrov D, Lopardo L, Giribet G, Arnedo MA, Alvarez-Padilla F, Hormiga G.

Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Apr 7;279(1732):1341-50. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.2011. Epub 2011 Nov 2.

6.

Spider movement, UV reflectance and size, but not spider crypsis, affect the response of honeybees to Australian crab spiders.

Llandres AL, Rodríguez-Gironés MA.

PLoS One. 2011 Feb 16;6(2):e17136. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0017136.

7.

Assassin bug uses aggressive mimicry to lure spider prey.

Wignall AE, Taylor PW.

Proc Biol Sci. 2011 May 7;278(1710):1427-33. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2010.2060. Epub 2010 Oct 27.

8.

Male-specific (Z)-9-tricosene stimulates female mating behaviour in the spider Pholcus beijingensis.

Xiao YH, Zhang JX, Li SQ.

Proc Biol Sci. 2010 Oct 7;277(1696):3009-18. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2010.0763. Epub 2010 May 12.

9.

Versatile aggressive mimicry of cicadas by an Australian predatory katydid.

Marshall DC, Hill KB.

PLoS One. 2009;4(1):e4185. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004185. Epub 2009 Jan 14.

10.

Does sex-selective predation stabilize or destabilize predator-prey dynamics?

Boukal DS, Berec L, Krivan V.

PLoS One. 2008 Jul 16;3(7):e2687. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002687.

11.

Phoretic nest parasites use sexual deception to obtain transport to their host's nest.

Saul-Gershenz LS, Millar JG.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Sep 19;103(38):14039-44. Epub 2006 Sep 11.

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