Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 18

1.

Influence of Estrogen Modulation on Glia Activation in a Murine Model of Parkinson's Disease.

Siani F, Greco R, Levandis G, Ghezzi C, Daviddi F, Demartini C, Vegeto E, Fuzzati-Armentero MT, Blandini F.

Front Neurosci. 2017 May 31;11:306. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2017.00306. eCollection 2017.

2.

Genes, Gender, Environment, and Novel Functions of Estrogen Receptor Beta in the Susceptibility to Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

Varshney M, Nalvarte I.

Brain Sci. 2017 Feb 23;7(3). pii: E24. doi: 10.3390/brainsci7030024. Review.

3.

A novel biomechanical analysis of gait changes in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

Geldenhuys WJ, Guseman TL, Pienaar IS, Dluzen DE, Young JW.

PeerJ. 2015 Aug 11;3:e1175. doi: 10.7717/peerj.1175. eCollection 2015.

4.

Sex hormones affect neurotransmitters and shape the adult female brain during hormonal transition periods.

Barth C, Villringer A, Sacher J.

Front Neurosci. 2015 Feb 20;9:37. doi: 10.3389/fnins.2015.00037. eCollection 2015. Review.

5.

Role of calbindin-D28K in estrogen treatment for Parkinson's disease.

Wang C, Jiang C, Yuan H, Xiao C, Gao D.

Neural Regen Res. 2013 Mar 15;8(8):702-7. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1673-5374.2013.08.004.

6.

Sex differences in Parkinson's disease.

Gillies GE, Pienaar IS, Vohra S, Qamhawi Z.

Front Neuroendocrinol. 2014 Aug;35(3):370-84. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2014.02.002. Epub 2014 Mar 4. Review.

7.

Peripheral vs. Central Sex Steroid Hormones in Experimental Parkinson's Disease.

McArthur S, Gillies GE.

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2011 Nov 30;2:82. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2011.00082. eCollection 2011.

8.
9.

Estrogen actions in the brain and the basis for differential action in men and women: a case for sex-specific medicines.

Gillies GE, McArthur S.

Pharmacol Rev. 2010 Jun;62(2):155-98. doi: 10.1124/pr.109.002071. Epub 2010 Apr 14. Review.

11.

The potential for estrogens in preventing Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

Simpkins JW, Perez E, Wang X, Yang S, Wen Y, Singh M.

Ther Adv Neurol Disord. 2009 Jan;2(1):31-49. doi: 10.1177/1756285608100427.

13.

Estrogen, testosterone, and sequential movement in men.

Siegel JA, Young LA, Neiss MB, Samuels MH, Roselli CE, Janowsky JS.

Behav Neurosci. 2008 Oct;122(5):955-62. doi: 10.1037/a0013045.

14.

Neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the frontal cortex in rats: persisting effects on locomotor activity, learning and nicotine self-administration.

Rezvani AH, Eddins D, Slade S, Hampton DS, Christopher NC, Petro A, Horton K, Johnson M, Levin ED.

Neuroscience. 2008 Jun 26;154(3):885-97. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2008.04.020. Epub 2008 Apr 16.

15.

Neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions of estrogen: basic mechanisms and clinical implications.

Brann DW, Dhandapani K, Wakade C, Mahesh VB, Khan MM.

Steroids. 2007 May;72(5):381-405. Epub 2007 Feb 21. Review.

16.

Menstrual cycle phase modulates reward-related neural function in women.

Dreher JC, Schmidt PJ, Kohn P, Furman D, Rubinow D, Berman KF.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Feb 13;104(7):2465-70. Epub 2007 Jan 31.

17.

Estrogen receptor beta expression in the embryonic brain regulates development of calretinin-immunoreactive GABAergic interneurons.

Fan X, Warner M, Gustafsson JA.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Dec 19;103(51):19338-43. Epub 2006 Dec 11.

18.

Profile of executive and memory function associated with amphetamine and opiate dependence.

Ersche KD, Clark L, London M, Robbins TW, Sahakian BJ.

Neuropsychopharmacology. 2006 May;31(5):1036-47.

Supplemental Content

Support Center