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Items: 15

1.

Effects of low-dose acetazolamide on exercise performance in simulated altitude.

Elisabeth E, Hannes G, Johannes B, Martin F, Elena P, Martin B.

Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol. 2017 Apr 15;9(2):28-34. eCollection 2017. Erratum in: Int J Physiol Pathophysiol Pharmacol. 2017 Sep 01;9(4):127.

2.

Redox Mechanism of Reactive Oxygen Species in Exercise.

He F, Li J, Liu Z, Chuang CC, Yang W, Zuo L.

Front Physiol. 2016 Nov 7;7:486. eCollection 2016. Review.

3.

Benzolamide improves oxygenation and reduces acute mountain sickness during a high-altitude trek and has fewer side effects than acetazolamide at sea level.

Collier DJ, Wolff CB, Hedges AM, Nathan J, Flower RJ, Milledge JS, Swenson ER.

Pharmacol Res Perspect. 2016 May 19;4(3):e00203. doi: 10.1002/prp2.203. eCollection 2016 Jun.

4.

Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Have Cardiac Repolarization Disturbances when Travelling to Altitude: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Acetazolamide.

Latshang TD, Kaufmann B, Nussbaumer-Ochsner Y, Ulrich S, Furian M, Kohler M, Thurnheer R, Saguner AM, Duru F, Bloch KE.

Sleep. 2016 Sep 1;39(9):1631-7. doi: 10.5665/sleep.6080.

5.

Common High Altitudes Illnesses a Primer for Healthcare Provider.

Mohsenin V.

Br J Med Med Res. 2015;7(12):1017-1025. Epub 2015 Apr 17.

6.

Acetazolamide pre-treatment before ascending to high altitudes: when to start?

Burtscher M, Gatterer H, Faulhaber M, Burtscher J.

Int J Clin Exp Med. 2014 Nov 15;7(11):4378-83. eCollection 2014.

7.

Pro: pulse oximetry is useful in predicting acute mountain sickness.

Basnyat B.

High Alt Med Biol. 2014 Dec;15(4):440-1. doi: 10.1089/ham.2014.1045. Review. No abstract available.

8.

Altitude-related cough.

Mason NP.

Cough. 2013 Oct 31;9(1):23. doi: 10.1186/1745-9974-9-23.

9.

High-altitude illnesses: physiology, risk factors, prevention, and treatment.

Taylor AT.

Rambam Maimonides Med J. 2011 Jan 31;2(1):e0022. doi: 10.5041/RMMJ.10022. Print 2011 Jan.

10.

Effect of acetazolamide and gingko biloba on the human pulmonary vascular response to an acute altitude ascent.

Ke T, Wang J, Swenson ER, Zhang X, Hu Y, Chen Y, Liu M, Zhang W, Zhao F, Shen X, Yang Q, Chen J, Luo W.

High Alt Med Biol. 2013 Jun;14(2):162-7. doi: 10.1089/ham.2012.1099.

11.

Identifying the lowest effective dose of acetazolamide for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Low EV, Avery AJ, Gupta V, Schedlbauer A, Grocott MP.

BMJ. 2012 Oct 18;345:e6779. doi: 10.1136/bmj.e6779. Review.

12.

Characteristics of Headache at Altitude among Trekkers; A comparison between Acute Mountain Sickness and Non-Acute Mountain Sickness Headache.

Alizadeh R, Ziaee V, Aghsaeifard Z, Mehrabi F, Ahmadinejad T.

Asian J Sports Med. 2012 Jun;3(2):126-30.

13.

Altitude sickness.

Murdoch D.

BMJ Clin Evid. 2010 Mar 18;2010. pii: 1209. Review.

14.

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation during sleep at 3800 m: Relationship to acute mountain sickness and sleeping oxyhaemoglobin saturation.

Johnson PL, Popa DA, Prisk GK, Edwards N, Sullivan CE.

Respirology. 2010 Feb;15(2):277-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1440-1843.2009.01678.x. Epub 2009 Dec 27.

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