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Items: 1 to 20 of 84

1.

[The significance of the factors of laterality and sex in the processes of selective attention].

Golosheĭkin SA, Vol'f NV, Razumnikova OM.

Zh Vyssh Nerv Deiat Im I P Pavlova. 1997 Jul-Aug;47(4):740-2. Russian. No abstract available.

PMID:
9381811
2.

Attention and interhemispheric transfer: a behavioral and fMRI study.

Weber B, Treyer V, Oberholzer N, Jaermann T, Boesiger P, Brugger P, Regard M, Buck A, Savazzi S, Marzi CA.

J Cogn Neurosci. 2005 Jan;17(1):113-23.

PMID:
15701243
3.

Orienting attention to locations in perceptual versus mental representations.

Nobre AC, Coull JT, Maquet P, Frith CD, Vandenberghe R, Mesulam MM.

J Cogn Neurosci. 2004 Apr;16(3):363-73.

PMID:
15072672
4.

Sex differences in cerebral laterality of language and visuospatial processing.

Clements AM, Rimrodt SL, Abel JR, Blankner JG, Mostofsky SH, Pekar JJ, Denckla MB, Cutting LE.

Brain Lang. 2006 Aug;98(2):150-8. Epub 2006 May 23.

PMID:
16716389
5.
6.

Attention modulates hemispheric differences in functional connectivity: evidence from MEG recordings.

Gootjes L, Bouma A, Van Strien JW, Scheltens P, Stam CJ.

Neuroimage. 2006 Mar;30(1):245-53. Epub 2005 Oct 25.

PMID:
16253520
7.

Visual field asymmetries in selective attention: evidence from a modified search paradigm.

Michael GA, Ojéda N.

Neurosci Lett. 2005 Nov 11;388(2):65-70.

PMID:
16026928
8.

Involuntary capture of attention produces domain-specific activation.

Finkbeiner M, Slotnick SD, Moo LR, Caramazza A.

Neuroreport. 2007 Jul 2;18(10):975-9.

PMID:
17558280
9.

[Sex difference in cerebral lateralization].

Sugishita M.

No To Shinkei. 1983 Sep;35(9):895-8. Japanese. No abstract available.

PMID:
6651987
10.

Global-local interference modulated by communication between the hemispheres.

Weissman DH, Banich MT.

J Exp Psychol Gen. 1999 Sep;128(3):283-308.

PMID:
10513397
11.

Electrophysiological analysis of cortical mechanisms of selective attention to high and low spatial frequencies.

Martínez A, Di Russo F, Anllo-Vento L, Hillyard SA.

Clin Neurophysiol. 2001 Nov;112(11):1980-98.

PMID:
11682336
12.

Hemispheric asymmetry for selective attention.

Chokron S, Brickman AM, Wei T, Buchsbaum MS.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 2000 Jan;9(1):85-90.

PMID:
10666560
13.

Attending to local form while ignoring global aspects depends on handedness: evidence from TMS.

Mevorach C, Humphreys GW, Shalev L.

Nat Neurosci. 2005 Mar;8(3):276-7. Epub 2005 Feb 6.

PMID:
15696162
14.

Right hemisphere dominance for auditory attention and its modulation by eye position: an event related fMRI study.

Petit L, Simon G, Joliot M, Andersson F, Bertin T, Zago L, Mellet E, Tzourio-Mazoyer N.

Restor Neurol Neurosci. 2007;25(3-4):211-25.

PMID:
17943000
15.

Hemispheric asymmetry in spatial attention across the menstrual cycle.

Hausmann M.

Neuropsychologia. 2005;43(11):1559-67. Epub 2005 Feb 25.

PMID:
16009238
16.

Gender differences in event-related potentials during visual-spatial attention.

Vaquero E, Cardoso MJ, Vázquez M, Gómez CM.

Int J Neurosci. 2004 Apr;114(4):541-57.

PMID:
15195357
17.

Selective attention event-related potential effects from auditory novel stimuli in children and adults.

Määttä S, Pääkkönen A, Saavalainen P, Partanen J.

Clin Neurophysiol. 2005 Jan;116(1):129-41.

PMID:
15589192
18.

The hemispherical laterality of the visual evoked potentials during simple dot stimulus in normal human subjects.

Omoto S, Kuroiwa Y, Li M, Kamitani T.

Neurosci Lett. 2000 Nov 17;294(2):89-92.

PMID:
11058794
19.
20.

Control of object-based attention in human cortex.

Serences JT, Schwarzbach J, Courtney SM, Golay X, Yantis S.

Cereb Cortex. 2004 Dec;14(12):1346-57. Epub 2004 May 27.

PMID:
15166105

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