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Items: 1 to 20 of 228

1.

Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) is required for the efferent phase of pulmonary cell-mediated immunity to a Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

Huffnagle GB, Strieter RM, McNeil LK, McDonald RA, Burdick MD, Kunkel SL, Toews GB.

J Immunol. 1997 Jul 1;159(1):318-27.

PMID:
9200469
2.

The role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha/CCL3 in regulation of T cell-mediated immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

Olszewski MA, Huffnagle GB, McDonald RA, Lindell DM, Moore BB, Cook DN, Toews GB.

J Immunol. 2000 Dec 1;165(11):6429-36.

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Chemokine responses and accumulation of inflammatory cells in the lungs of mice infected with highly virulent Cryptococcus neoformans: effects of interleukin-12.

Kawakami K, Shibuya K, Qureshi MH, Zhang T, Koguchi Y, Tohyama M, Xie Q, Naoe S, Saito A.

FEMS Immunol Med Microbiol. 1999 Sep;25(4):391-402.

5.

The role of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in the recruitment of monocytes and CD4+ T cells during a pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

Huffnagle GB, Strieter RM, Standiford TJ, McDonald RA, Burdick MD, Kunkel SL, Toews GB.

J Immunol. 1995 Nov 15;155(10):4790-7.

PMID:
7594481
6.

Enhanced innate immune responsiveness to pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection is associated with resistance to progressive infection.

Guillot L, Carroll SF, Homer R, Qureshi ST.

Infect Immun. 2008 Oct;76(10):4745-56. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00341-08. Epub 2008 Aug 4.

7.

Generation of antifungal effector CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD4+ T cells during Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

Lindell DM, Moore TA, McDonald RA, Toews GB, Huffnagle GB.

J Immunol. 2005 Jun 15;174(12):7920-8.

8.

Afferent phase production of TNF-alpha is required for the development of protective T cell immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans.

Huffnagle GB, Toews GB, Burdick MD, Boyd MB, McAllister KS, McDonald RA, Kunkel SL, Strieter RM.

J Immunol. 1996 Nov 15;157(10):4529-36.

PMID:
8906831
9.

The role of chemokines and their receptors in the rejection of pig islet tissue xenografts.

Solomon MF, Kuziel WA, Mann DA, Simeonovic CJ.

Xenotransplantation. 2003 Mar;10(2):164-77.

PMID:
12588649
10.

Leukocyte recruitment during pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

Huffnagle GB, Traynor TR, McDonald RA, Olszewski MA, Lindell DM, Herring AC, Toews GB.

Immunopharmacology. 2000 Jul 25;48(3):231-6. Review.

PMID:
10960662
11.

TNF and IL-6 mediate MIP-1alpha expression in bleomycin-induced lung injury.

Smith RE, Strieter RM, Phan SH, Lukacs N, Kunkel SL.

J Leukoc Biol. 1998 Oct;64(4):528-36.

12.

Neutralization of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) and MIP-1alpha attenuates neutrophil recruitment in the central nervous system during experimental bacterial meningitis.

Diab A, Abdalla H, Li HL, Shi FD, Zhu J, Höjberg B, Lindquist L, Wretlind B, Bakhiet M, Link H.

Infect Immun. 1999 May;67(5):2590-601.

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16.

Chemokine expression during the development and resolution of a pulmonary leukocyte response to influenza A virus infection in mice.

Wareing MD, Lyon AB, Lu B, Gerard C, Sarawar SR.

J Leukoc Biol. 2004 Oct;76(4):886-95. Epub 2004 Jul 7.

PMID:
15240757
17.

Role of chemokines and formyl peptides in pneumococcal pneumonia-induced monocyte/macrophage recruitment.

Fillion I, Ouellet N, Simard M, Bergeron Y, Sato S, Bergeron MG.

J Immunol. 2001 Jun 15;166(12):7353-61.

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20.

Beta-chemokine function in experimental lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

Krishnadasan B, Farivar AS, Naidu BV, Woolley SM, Byrne K, Fraga CH, Mulligan MS.

Ann Thorac Surg. 2004 Mar;77(3):1056-62.

PMID:
14992926

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