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Items: 1 to 20 of 235

1.
3.

Job strain in men, but not in women, predicts a significant rise in blood pressure after 6.5 years of follow-up.

Ohlin B, Berglund G, Rosvall M, Nilsson PM.

J Hypertens. 2007 Mar;25(3):525-31.

PMID:
17278967
4.

Job strain and ambulatory blood pressure profiles.

Theorell T, de Faire U, Johnson J, Hall E, Perski A, Stewart W.

Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991 Dec;17(6):380-5.

5.

A longitudinal study of job strain and ambulatory blood pressure: results from a three-year follow-up.

Schnall PL, Schwartz JE, Landsbergis PA, Warren K, Pickering TG.

Psychosom Med. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):697-706.

PMID:
9847028
6.

The impact of job strain and marital cohesion on ambulatory blood pressure during 1 year: the double exposure study.

Tobe SW, Kiss A, Sainsbury S, Jesin M, Geerts R, Baker B.

Am J Hypertens. 2007 Feb;20(2):148-53.

PMID:
17261459
7.

Influence of job strain and emotion on blood pressure in female hospital personnel during workhours.

Theorell T, Ahlberg-Hulten G, Jodko M, Sigala F, de la Torre B.

Scand J Work Environ Health. 1993 Oct;19(5):313-8.

8.

The association between daily blood pressure and catecholamine variability in normotensive working women.

James GD, Schlussel YR, Pickering TG.

Psychosom Med. 1993 Jan-Feb;55(1):55-60.

PMID:
8446742
9.

Impact of job and marital strain on ambulatory blood pressure results from the double exposure study.

Tobe SW, Kiss A, Szalai JP, Perkins N, Tsigoulis M, Baker B.

Am J Hypertens. 2005 Aug;18(8):1046-51.

PMID:
16109318
10.

Job strain, job demands and adrenergic beta1-receptor-polymorphism: a possible interaction affecting blood pressure in men.

Ohlin B, Berglund G, Nilsson PM, Melander O.

J Hypertens. 2008 Aug;26(8):1583-9. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e328303df5f.

PMID:
18622236
11.
12.

Job strain, blood pressure and response to uncontrollable stress.

Steptoe A, Cropley M, Joekes K.

J Hypertens. 1999 Feb;17(2):193-200.

PMID:
10067788
13.

Variation in the ambulatory blood pressure response to daily work load--the moderating role of job control.

Melamed S, Kristal-Boneh E, Harari G, Froom P, Ribak J.

Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Jun;24(3):190-6.

14.

Differences in ambulatory blood pressure between men and women with mild hypertension.

Eison H, Phillips RA, Ardeljan M, Krakoff LR.

J Hum Hypertens. 1990 Aug;4(4):400-4.

PMID:
2258884
15.

Do the daily experiences of healthy men and women vary according to occupational prestige and work strain?

Matthews KA, Räikkönen K, Everson SA, Flory JD, Marco CA, Owens JF, Lloyd CE.

Psychosom Med. 2000 May-Jun;62(3):346-53.

PMID:
10845348
16.

Job strain and physiological stress responses in nurses and nurse's aides: predictors of daily blood pressure variability.

Brown DE, James GD, Nordloh L, Jones AA.

Blood Press Monit. 2003 Dec;8(6):237-42.

PMID:
14688553
17.

Cardiovascular stress reactivity and job strain as determinants of ambulatory blood pressure at work.

Steptoe A, Roy MP, Evans O, Snashall D.

J Hypertens. 1995 Feb;13(2):201-10.

PMID:
7615950
18.

Relationship of clinic, ambulatory, and laboratory stress blood pressure to left ventricular mass in overweight men and women with high blood pressure.

Sherwood A, Gullette EC, Hinderliter AL, Georgiades A, Babyak M, Waugh RA, Blumenthal JA.

Psychosom Med. 2002 Mar-Apr;64(2):247-57.

PMID:
11914440
19.

Marital differences in blood pressure and the risk of hypertension among Polish men.

Lipowicz A, Lopuszanska M.

Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(5):421-7.

PMID:
16080590
20.

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