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Items: 1 to 20 of 110

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[Cardiovascular risk factors and prevention in women: similarities and differences].

Sclavo M.

Ital Heart J Suppl. 2001 Feb;2(2):125-41. Review. Italian.

PMID:
11255880
4.

Search for an optimal atherogenic lipid risk profile: from the Framingham Study.

Nam BH, Kannel WB, D'Agostino RB.

Am J Cardiol. 2006 Feb 1;97(3):372-5.

PMID:
16442398
5.

[Women and ischemic cardiopathy].

Assmann G, Davignon J, Fernández Cruz A, Gotto AM Jr, Jacotot B, Lewis B, Paoletti R.

Rev Clin Esp. 1989 Oct;185(6):308-15. Review. Spanish.

PMID:
2695994
6.

Diabetes, blood lipids, and the role of obesity in coronary heart disease risk for women. The Framingham study.

Gordon T, Castelli WP, Hjortland MC, Kannel WB, Dawber TR.

Ann Intern Med. 1977 Oct;87(4):393-7.

PMID:
199096
7.

Importance of LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio as a predictor for coronary heart disease events in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia: a 15-year follow-up (1987-2002).

Panagiotakos DB, Pitsavos C, Skoumas J, Chrysohoou C, Toutouza M, Stefanadis CI, Toutouzas PK.

Curr Med Res Opin. 2003;19(2):89-94.

PMID:
12755140
8.

Atherogenesis: why women live longer than men.

Hazzard WR.

Geriatrics. 1985 Jan;40(1):42-51, 54.

PMID:
3965355
9.

Impact of body mass index on coronary heart disease risk factors in men and women. The Framingham Offspring Study.

Lamon-Fava S, Wilson PW, Schaefer EJ.

Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1996 Dec;16(12):1509-15.

10.

Myocardial infarction in women.

Johansson S, Vedin A, Wilhelmsson C.

Epidemiol Rev. 1983;5:67-95. Review.

PMID:
6357823
11.

Metabolic factors clustering, lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein E phenotypes in premature coronary artery disease in French Canadians.

Weber M, McNicoll S, Marcil M, Connelly P, Lussier-Cacan S, Davignon J, Latour Y, Genest J Jr.

Can J Cardiol. 1997 Mar;13(3):253-60.

PMID:
9117913
12.

Coronary heart disease prevalence and its relation to risk factors in American Indians. The Strong Heart Study.

Howard BV, Lee ET, Cowan LD, Fabsitz RR, Howard WJ, Oopik AJ, Robbins DC, Savage PJ, Yeh JL, Welty TK.

Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Aug 1;142(3):254-68.

PMID:
7631630
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Coronary risk in growth hormone deficient hypopituitary adults: increased predicted risk is due largely to lipid profile abnormalities.

Abdu TA, Neary R, Elhadd TA, Akber M, Clayton RN.

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2001 Aug;55(2):209-16. Erratum in: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 2001 Nov;55(5):699.

PMID:
11531927
15.

Coronary heart disease prediction from lipoprotein cholesterol levels, triglycerides, lipoprotein(a), apolipoproteins A-I and B, and HDL density subfractions: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

Sharrett AR, Ballantyne CM, Coady SA, Heiss G, Sorlie PD, Catellier D, Patsch W; Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study Group.

Circulation. 2001 Sep 4;104(10):1108-13.

16.

Risk factors for coronary heart disease in women.

Hennekens CH.

Cardiol Clin. 1998 Feb;16(1):1-8. Review.

PMID:
9507775
17.

Dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia predict coronary heart disease events in middle-aged patients with NIDDM.

Lehto S, Rönnemaa T, Haffner SM, Pyörälä K, Kallio V, Laakso M.

Diabetes. 1997 Aug;46(8):1354-9.

PMID:
9231662
18.

Serial epidemiological surveys in an urban Indian population demonstrate increasing coronary risk factors among the lower socioeconomic strata.

Gupta R, Gupta VP, Sarna M, Prakash H, Rastogi S, Gupta KD.

J Assoc Physicians India. 2003 May;51:470-7.

PMID:
12974428
20.

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