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Items: 1 to 20 of 104

1.

Influence of periconception smoking behavior on birth defect risk.

Perry MF, Mulcahy H, DeFranco EA.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2019 Jun;220(6):588.e1-588.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2019.02.029. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

PMID:
30790570
2.

Association of reported trimester-specific smoking cessation with fetal growth restriction.

Blatt K, Moore E, Chen A, Van Hook J, DeFranco EA.

Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Jun;125(6):1452-9. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000679.

3.

Relationship of trimester-specific smoking patterns and risk of preterm birth.

Moore E, Blatt K, Chen A, Van Hook J, DeFranco EA.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Jul;215(1):109.e1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2016.01.167. Epub 2016 Jan 28.

4.

A case control population-based study investigating smoking as a risk factor for gastroschisis in Utah, 1997-2005.

Feldkamp ML, Alder SC, Carey JC.

Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2008 Nov;82(11):768-75. doi: 10.1002/bdra.20519.

PMID:
18985693
5.

Modifying the risk of recurrent preterm birth: influence of trimester-specific changes in smoking behaviors.

Wallace JL, Aland KL, Blatt K, Moore E, DeFranco EA.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Mar;216(3):310.e1-310.e8. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2016.11.1034. Epub 2016 Nov 18.

PMID:
27871837
6.
7.

Associations between maternal periconceptional exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke and major birth defects.

Hoyt AT, Canfield MA, Romitti PA, Botto LD, Anderka MT, Krikov SV, Tarpey MK, Feldkamp ML.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Nov;215(5):613.e1-613.e11. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2016.07.022. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

PMID:
27443814
8.

Pre-conceptional vitamin/folic acid supplementation 2007: the use of folic acid in combination with a multivitamin supplement for the prevention of neural tube defects and other congenital anomalies.

Wilson RD; GENETICS COMMITTEE; MOTHERISK.

J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007 Dec;29(12):1003-1013. doi: 10.1016/S1701-2163(16)32685-8. English, French. Erratum in: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Mar;30(3):193. Goh, Ingrid [corrected to Goh, Y Ingrid].

PMID:
18053387
9.
10.

Maternal smoking and congenital heart defects.

Malik S, Cleves MA, Honein MA, Romitti PA, Botto LD, Yang S, Hobbs CA; National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

Pediatrics. 2008 Apr;121(4):e810-6. doi: 10.1542/peds.2007-1519.

PMID:
18381510
11.

Preconception care: caffeine, smoking, alcohol, drugs and other environmental chemical/radiation exposure.

Lassi ZS, Imam AM, Dean SV, Bhutta ZA.

Reprod Health. 2014 Sep 26;11 Suppl 3:S6. doi: 10.1186/1742-4755-11-S3-S6. Epub 2014 Sep 26. Review.

12.

Pre-conception Folic Acid and Multivitamin Supplementation for the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Neural Tube Defects and Other Folic Acid-Sensitive Congenital Anomalies.

Wilson RD; Genetics Committee, Wilson RD, Audibert F, Brock JA, Carroll J, Cartier L, Gagnon A, Johnson JA, Langlois S, Murphy-Kaulbeck L, Okun N, Pastuck M; Special Contributors, Deb-Rinker P, Dodds L, Leon JA, Lowel HL, Luo W, MacFarlane A, McMillan R, Moore A, Mundle W, O'Connor D, Ray J, Van den Hof M.

J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2015 Jun;37(6):534-52. English, French.

PMID:
26334606
13.

Association of Maternal Cigarette Smoking and Smoking Cessation With Preterm Birth.

Soneji S, Beltrán-Sánchez H.

JAMA Netw Open. 2019 Apr 5;2(4):e192514. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.2514.

14.

Environmental and individual exposure and the risk of congenital anomalies: a review of recent epidemiological evidence.

Baldacci S, Gorini F, Santoro M, Pierini A, Minichilli F, Bianchi F.

Epidemiol Prev. 2018 May-Aug;42(3-4 Suppl 1):1-34. doi: 10.19191/EP18.3-4.S1.P001.057. Review.

15.

Core state preconception health indicators - pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system and behavioral risk factor surveillance system, 2009.

Robbins CL, Zapata LB, Farr SL, Kroelinger CD, Morrow B, Ahluwalia I, D'Angelo DV, Barradas D, Cox S, Goodman D, Williams L, Grigorescu V, Barfield WD; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

MMWR Surveill Summ. 2014 Apr 25;63(3):1-62.

16.

Periconception maternal characteristics and embryonic growth trajectories: the Rotterdam Predict study.

van Uitert EM, van der Elst-Otte N, Wilbers JJ, Exalto N, Willemsen SP, Eilers PH, Koning AH, Steegers EA, Steegers-Theunissen RP.

Hum Reprod. 2013 Dec;28(12):3188-96. doi: 10.1093/humrep/det375. Epub 2013 Oct 8.

PMID:
24105824
17.

Low birthweight, preterm births and intrauterine growth retardation in relation to maternal smoking.

Horta BL, Victora CG, Menezes AM, Halpern R, Barros FC.

Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 1997 Apr;11(2):140-51.

PMID:
9131707
18.

Smoking cessation in the first trimester reduces most obstetric risks, but not the risks of major congenital anomalies and admission to neonatal care: a population-based cohort study of 1,164,953 singleton pregnancies in Finland.

Räisänen S, Sankilampi U, Gissler M, Kramer MR, Hakulinen-Viitanen T, Saari J, Heinonen S.

J Epidemiol Community Health. 2014 Feb;68(2):159-64. doi: 10.1136/jech-2013-202991. Epub 2013 Oct 24.

PMID:
24158704
19.

Preconception mental health predicts pregnancy complications and adverse birth outcomes: a national population-based study.

Witt WP, Wisk LE, Cheng ER, Hampton JM, Hagen EW.

Matern Child Health J. 2012 Oct;16(7):1525-41. doi: 10.1007/s10995-011-0916-4.

20.

Periconception Exposure to Air Pollution and Risk of Congenital Malformations.

Ren S, Haynes E, Hall E, Hossain M, Chen A, Muglia L, Lu L, DeFranco E.

J Pediatr. 2018 Feb;193:76-84.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.076. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

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