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Items: 1 to 20 of 101

1.

Female Japanese quail visually differentiate testosterone-dependent male attractiveness for mating preferences.

Hiyama G, Mizushima S, Matsuzaki M, Tobari Y, Choi JH, Ono T, Tsudzuki M, Makino S, Tamiya G, Tsukahara N, Sugita S, Sasanami T.

Sci Rep. 2018 Jul 3;8(1):10012. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-28368-z.

2.

Male red ornamentation is associated with female red sensitivity in sticklebacks.

Rick IP, Mehlis M, Bakker TC.

PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e25554. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025554. Epub 2011 Sep 30.

3.

Plumage coloration and social context influence male investment in song.

Henderson LJ, Brazeal KR, Hahn TP.

Biol Lett. 2018 Jul;14(7). pii: 20180300. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2018.0300.

4.

Female plumage coloration is sensitive to the cost of reproduction. An experiment in blue tits.

Doutrelant C, Grégoire A, Midamegbe A, Lambrechts M, Perret P.

J Anim Ecol. 2012 Jan;81(1):87-96. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2011.01889.x. Epub 2011 Aug 5.

PMID:
21819397
5.

Sexually selected male plumage color is testosterone dependent in a tropical passerine bird, the red-backed fairy-wren (Malurus melanocephalus).

Lindsay WR, Webster MS, Schwabl H.

PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e26067. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0026067. Epub 2011 Oct 5.

6.

Do unattractive friends make you look better? Context-dependent male mating preferences in the guppy.

Gasparini C, Serena G, Pilastro A.

Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Feb 13;280(1756):20123072. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.3072. Print 2013 Apr 7.

7.

How to reduce the costs of ornaments without reducing their effectiveness? An example of a mechanism from carotenoid-based plumage.

Surmacki A, Ragan A, Kosiński Z, Tobółka M, Podkowa P.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol. 2016;70:695-700. Epub 2016 Feb 29.

8.
9.

The fractal dimension of a conspicuous ornament varies with mating status and shows assortative mating in wild red-legged partridges (Alectoris rufa).

Cantarero A, Carrasco Naranjo J, Casas F, Mougeot F, Viñuela J, Alonso-Alvarez C.

Naturwissenschaften. 2018 Jun 29;105(7-8):45. doi: 10.1007/s00114-018-1565-x.

PMID:
29959540
10.

An integrative view of sexual selection in Tribolium flour beetles.

Fedina TY, Lewis SM.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2008 May;83(2):151-71. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-185X.2008.00037.x. Review.

PMID:
18429767
11.

MALE MATE CHOICE AND THE EVOLUTION OF FEMALE PLUMAGE COLORATION IN THE HOUSE FINCH.

Hill GE.

Evolution. 1993 Oct;47(5):1515-1525. doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.1993.tb02172.x.

PMID:
28564892
12.

Plumage phenotypes and mate preferences in Japanese quail 2. sexual imprinting.

Blohowiak CC, Siegel PB.

Behav Processes. 1983 Jul;8(3):255-75. doi: 10.1016/0376-6357(83)90016-5.

PMID:
24923714
13.

The effects of life history and sexual selection on male and female plumage colouration.

Dale J, Dey CJ, Delhey K, Kempenaers B, Valcu M.

Nature. 2015 Nov 19;527(7578):367-70. doi: 10.1038/nature15509. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

PMID:
26536112
14.

Are high-quality mates always attractive?: State-dependent mate preferences in birds and humans.

Riebel K, Holveck MJ, Verhulst S, Fawcett TW.

Commun Integr Biol. 2010 May;3(3):271-3.

15.

A field test of female mate preference for male plumage coloration in eastern bluebirds.

Liu M, Siefferman L, Mays H Jr, Steffen JE, Hill GE.

Anim Behav. 2009 Oct;78(4):879-885.

16.

Facultative adjustment of the offspring sex ratio and male attractiveness: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Booksmythe I, Mautz B, Davis J, Nakagawa S, Jennions MD.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2017 Feb;92(1):108-134. doi: 10.1111/brv.12220. Epub 2015 Sep 25. Review.

17.

Genetic variation and covariation in male attractiveness and female mating preferences in Drosophila melanogaster.

Ratterman NL, Rosenthal GG, Carney GE, Jones AG.

G3 (Bethesda). 2014 Jan 10;4(1):79-88. doi: 10.1534/g3.113.007468.

18.

Assortative mating by carotenoid-based plumage colour: a quality indicator in American goldfinches, Carduelis tristis.

MacDougall AK, Montgomerie R.

Naturwissenschaften. 2003 Oct;90(10):464-7. Epub 2003 Aug 27.

PMID:
14564406
19.

Conspicuous female ornamentation and tests of male mate preference in threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

Wright DS, Pierotti ME, Rundle HD, McKinnon JS.

PLoS One. 2015 Mar 25;10(3):e0120723. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0120723. eCollection 2015.

20.

Hot or not: the effects of exogenous testosterone on female attractiveness to male conspecifics in the budgerigar.

Lahaye SE, Eens M, Darras VM, Pinxten R.

PLoS One. 2013 Aug 12;8(8):e74005. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074005. eCollection 2013.

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