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Items: 1 to 20 of 92

1.

Enlisting the willing: A study of healthcare professional-initiated and opt-in biobanking consent reveals improvement opportunities throughout the registration process.

Fradgley EA, Chong SE, Cox ME, Paul CL, Gedye C.

Eur J Cancer. 2018 Jan;89:36-41. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2017.10.025. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

2.

Patients' experiences and preferences for opt-in models and health professional involvement in biobanking consent: A cross-sectional survey of Australian cancer outpatients.

Fradgley EA, Chong SE, Cox ME, Gedye C, Paul CL.

Asia Pac J Clin Oncol. 2019 Feb;15(1):31-37. doi: 10.1111/ajco.12866. Epub 2018 Mar 23.

PMID:
29573159
3.

"As Long as You Ask": A Qualitative Study of Biobanking Consent-Oncology Patients' and Health Care Professionals' Attitudes, Motivations, and Experiences-the B-PPAE Study.

Yip S, Fleming J, Shepherd HL, Walczak A, Clark J, Butow P.

Oncologist. 2019 Jun;24(6):844-856. doi: 10.1634/theoncologist.2018-0233. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

PMID:
30413662
4.

Public support and consent preference for biomedical research and biobanking in Jordan.

Ahram M, Othman A, Shahrouri M.

Eur J Hum Genet. 2013 May;21(5):567-70. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2012.213. Epub 2012 Sep 12.

5.

Biobanking in Israel 2016-17; expressed perceptions versus real life enrollment.

Koren G, Beller D, Laifenfeld D, Grossman I, Shalev V.

BMC Med Ethics. 2017 Nov 17;18(1):63. doi: 10.1186/s12910-017-0223-8.

6.

For what am I participating? The need for communication after receiving consent from biobanking project participants: experience in Japan.

Watanabe M, Inoue Y, Chang C, Hong H, Kobayashi I, Suzuki S, Muto K.

J Hum Genet. 2011 May;56(5):358-63. doi: 10.1038/jhg.2011.19. Epub 2011 Mar 10.

PMID:
21390038
7.

Health professionals' opinions on supporting a cancer biobank: identification of barriers to combat biobanking pitfalls.

Caixeiro NJ, Byun HL, Descallar J, Levesque JV, de Souza P, Soon Lee C.

Eur J Hum Genet. 2016 May;24(5):626-32. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2015.191. Epub 2015 Sep 2. Review.

8.

Opinions of Young Adults on Re-Consenting for Biobanking.

Rush A, Battisti R, Barton B, Catchpoole D.

J Pediatr. 2015 Oct;167(4):925-30. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.07.005. Epub 2015 Jul 30.

PMID:
26235663
9.

Informed consent for biobanking research: cancer patient recruitment from rural communities in Maine.

Morrison DG, Farah C, Hock JM.

Biopreserv Biobank. 2013 Apr;11(2):107-14. doi: 10.1089/bio.2012.0054.

PMID:
24845431
10.

Consent for biobanking: assessing the understanding and views of cancer patients.

Mancini J, Pellegrini I, Viret F, Vey N, Daufresne LM, Chabannon C, Julian-Reynier C.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2011 Jan 19;103(2):154-7. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djq498. Epub 2010 Dec 20.

PMID:
21173381
11.

Oncology patients overwhelmingly support tissue banking.

Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher R, Fradgley E, Regan T, Hobden B, Ackland SP.

BMC Cancer. 2015 May 17;15:413. doi: 10.1186/s12885-015-1416-5.

12.

Public Attitudes toward Consent and Data Sharing in Biobank Research: A Large Multi-site Experimental Survey in the US.

Sanderson SC, Brothers KB, Mercaldo ND, Clayton EW, Antommaria AHM, Aufox SA, Brilliant MH, Campos D, Carrell DS, Connolly J, Conway P, Fullerton SM, Garrison NA, Horowitz CR, Jarvik GP, Kaufman D, Kitchner TE, Li R, Ludman EJ, McCarty CA, McCormick JB, McManus VD, Myers MF, Scrol A, Williams JL, Shrubsole MJ, Schildcrout JS, Smith ME, Holm IA.

Am J Hum Genet. 2017 Mar 2;100(3):414-427. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.01.021. Epub 2017 Feb 9.

13.

Informed consent for biobanking: consensus-based guidelines for adequate comprehension.

Beskow LM, Dombeck CB, Thompson CP, Watson-Ormond JK, Weinfurt KP.

Genet Med. 2015 Mar;17(3):226-33. doi: 10.1038/gim.2014.102. Epub 2014 Aug 21.

14.

No regrets: Young adult patients in psychiatry report positive reactions to biobank participation.

Cunningham JL, Zanzi M, Willebrand M, Ekselius L, Ramklint M.

BMC Psychiatry. 2017 Jan 17;17(1):21. doi: 10.1186/s12888-017-1199-0. Erratum in: BMC Psychiatry. 2017 Feb 20;17 (1):74.

15.

Broad consent for health care-embedded biobanking: understanding and reasons to donate in a large patient sample.

Richter G, Krawczak M, Lieb W, Wolff L, Schreiber S, Buyx A.

Genet Med. 2018 Jan;20(1):76-82. doi: 10.1038/gim.2017.82. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

PMID:
28640237
16.

Standard Versus Simplified Consent Materials for Biobank Participation: Differences in Patient Knowledge and Trial Accrual.

Garrett SB, Murphy M, Wiley J, Dohan D.

J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics. 2017 Dec;12(5):326-334. doi: 10.1177/1556264617731869. Epub 2017 Oct 16.

PMID:
29037106
17.

Fair Shares and Sharing Fairly: A Survey of Public Views on Open Science, Informed Consent and Participatory Research in Biobanking.

Joly Y, Dalpé G, So D, Birko S.

PLoS One. 2015 Jul 8;10(7):e0129893. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0129893. eCollection 2015.

18.

Factors that may influence the willingness of cancer patients to consent for biobanking.

Pillai U, Phillips K, Wilkins G, Baxter RC, Benn DE, Parker NR, Smith RC, Marsh DJ.

Biopreserv Biobank. 2014 Dec;12(6):409-14. doi: 10.1089/bio.2014.0039.

PMID:
25496153
19.

Preferences for opt-in and opt-out enrollment and consent models in biobank research: a national survey of Veterans Administration patients.

Kaufman D, Bollinger J, Dvoskin R, Scott J.

Genet Med. 2012 Sep;14(9):787-94. doi: 10.1038/gim.2012.45. Epub 2012 Apr 26.

PMID:
22538255
20.

Scientists' perspectives on consent in the context of biobanking research.

Master Z, Campo-Engelstein L, Caulfield T.

Eur J Hum Genet. 2015 May;23(5):569-74. doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2014.143. Epub 2014 Jul 30.

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