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Items: 1 to 20 of 104

1.

Post-copulatory opportunities for sperm competition and cryptic female choice provide no offspring fitness benefits in externally fertilizing salmon.

Lumley AJ, Diamond SE, Einum S, Yeates SE, Peruffo D, Emerson BC, Gage MJ.

R Soc Open Sci. 2016 Mar 2;3(3):150709. doi: 10.1098/rsos.150709. eCollection 2016 Mar.

2.

Why do females mate multiply? A review of the genetic benefits.

Jennions MD, Petrie M.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2000 Feb;75(1):21-64. Review.

PMID:
10740892
3.

Genetic and potential non-genetic benefits increase offspring fitness of polyandrous females in non-resource based mating system.

Kekäläinen J, Rudolfsen G, Janhunen M, Figenschou L, Peuhkuri N, Tamper N, Kortet R.

BMC Evol Biol. 2010 Jan 22;10:20. doi: 10.1186/1471-2148-10-20.

4.

Spermatozoal traits and sperm competition in Atlantic salmon: relative sperm velocity is the primary determinant of fertilization success.

Gage MJ, Macfarlane CP, Yeates S, Ward RG, Searle JB, Parker GA.

Curr Biol. 2004 Jan 6;14(1):44-7.

5.

Estimating genetic benefits of polyandry from experimental studies: a meta-analysis.

Slatyer RA, Mautz BS, Backwell PR, Jennions MD.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2012 Feb;87(1):1-33. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-185X.2011.00182.x. Epub 2011 May 5.

PMID:
21545390
6.

No support for the sexy-sperm hypothesis in the seed beetle: Sons of monandrous females fare better in post-copulatory competition.

Hook KA.

Ecol Evol. 2018 Oct 31;8(23):11742-11753. doi: 10.1002/ece3.4626. eCollection 2018 Dec.

7.

BENEFITS OF MULTIPLE MATES IN THE CRICKET GRYLLUS BIMACULATUS.

Tregenza T, Wedell N.

Evolution. 1998 Dec;52(6):1726-1730. doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.1998.tb02252.x.

PMID:
28565303
8.

Cryptic female choice enhances fertilization success and embryo survival in chinook salmon.

Rosengrave P, Montgomerie R, Gemmell N.

Proc Biol Sci. 2016 Mar 30;283(1827):20160001. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2016.0001.

9.

The more the better - polyandry and genetic similarity are positively linked to reproductive success in a natural population of terrestrial salamanders (Salamandra salamandra).

Caspers BA, Krause ET, Hendrix R, Kopp M, Rupp O, Rosentreter K, Steinfartz S.

Mol Ecol. 2014 Jan;23(1):239-50. doi: 10.1111/mec.12577. Epub 2013 Nov 28.

PMID:
24168518
10.

Tactic-specific benefits of polyandry in Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha.

Lewis JA, Pitcher TE.

J Fish Biol. 2017 Apr;90(4):1244-1256. doi: 10.1111/jfb.13223. Epub 2016 Nov 21.

PMID:
27873318
11.

Sperm competition, but not major histocompatibility divergence, drives differential fertilization success between alternative reproductive tactics in Chinook salmon.

Lehnert SJ, Helou L, Pitcher TE, Heath JW, Heath DD.

J Evol Biol. 2018 Jan;31(1):88-97. doi: 10.1111/jeb.13199. Epub 2017 Nov 2.

PMID:
29055057
12.

A nonsemen copulatory fluid influences the outcome of sperm competition in Japanese quail.

Finseth FR, Iacovelli SR, Harrison RG, Adkins-Regan EK.

J Evol Biol. 2013 Sep;26(9):1875-89. doi: 10.1111/jeb.12189. Epub 2013 Jul 26.

13.

Sperm variation within a single ejaculate affects offspring development in Atlantic salmon.

Immler S, Hotzy C, Alavioon G, Petersson E, Arnqvist G.

Biol Lett. 2014 Feb 12;10(2):20131040. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2013.1040. Print 2014 Feb.

14.

Effects of ovarian fluid and genetic differences on sperm performance and fertilization success of alternative reproductive tactics in Chinook salmon.

Lehnert SJ, Butts IAE, Flannery EW, Peters KM, Heath DD, Pitcher TE.

J Evol Biol. 2017 Jun;30(6):1236-1245. doi: 10.1111/jeb.13088. Epub 2017 May 2.

15.

Sexual selection for genetic compatibility: the role of the major histocompatibility complex on cryptic female choice in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

Gessner C, Nakagawa S, Zavodna M, Gemmell NJ.

Heredity (Edinb). 2017 May;118(5):442-452. doi: 10.1038/hdy.2016.116. Epub 2017 Jan 4.

16.

Atlantic salmon eggs favour sperm in competition that have similar major histocompatibility alleles.

Yeates SE, Einum S, Fleming IA, Megens HJ, Stet RJ, Hindar K, Holt WV, Van Look KJ, Gage MJ.

Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Feb 7;276(1656):559-66. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1257.

17.

Male Investments in High Quality Sperm Improve Fertilization Success, but May Have Negative Impact on Offspring Fitness in Whitefish.

Kekäläinen J, Soler C, Veentaus S, Huuskonen H.

PLoS One. 2015 Sep 21;10(9):e0137005. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0137005. eCollection 2015.

18.

In vitro fertilization experiments using sockeye salmon reveal that bigger eggs are more fertilizable under sperm limitation.

Macfarlane CP, Hoysak DJ, Liley NR, Gage MJ.

Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Jul 7;276(1666):2503-7. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2009.0295. Epub 2009 Apr 8.

19.

Post-thawed motility and fertility from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) sperm frozen with four cryodiluents in straws or pellets.

Dziewulska K, Rzemieniecki A, Czerniawski R, Domagała J.

Theriogenology. 2011 Jul 15;76(2):300-11. doi: 10.1016/j.theriogenology.2011.02.007. Epub 2011 Apr 14.

PMID:
21496895
20.

Polyandrous females produce sons that are successful at post-copulatory competition.

Klemme I, Bäumer J, Eccard JA, Ylönen H.

J Evol Biol. 2014 Mar;27(3):457-65. doi: 10.1111/jeb.12334. Epub 2014 Feb 12.

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