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Items: 1 to 20 of 138

2.

Meteorological variables and bacillary dysentery cases in Changsha City, China.

Gao L, Zhang Y, Ding G, Liu Q, Zhou M, Li X, Jiang B.

Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2014 Apr;90(4):697-704. doi: 10.4269/ajtmh.13-0198. Epub 2014 Mar 3.

3.

Hand-foot-and-mouth disease and weather factors in Guangzhou, southern China.

Li T, Yang Z, DI B, Wang M.

Epidemiol Infect. 2014 Aug;142(8):1741-50. doi: 10.1017/S0950268813002938. Epub 2013 Nov 22.

PMID:
24267476
4.
5.

Projected Years Lost due to Disabilities (YLDs) for bacillary dysentery related to increased temperature in temperate and subtropical cities of China.

Zhang Y, Bi P, Sun Y, Hiller JE.

J Environ Monit. 2012 Feb;14(2):510-6. doi: 10.1039/c1em10391a. Epub 2011 Dec 1.

PMID:
22130387
6.

Identifying high-risk areas of bacillary dysentery and associated meteorological factors in Wuhan, China.

Li Z, Wang L, Sun W, Hou X, Yang H, Sun L, Xu S, Sun Q, Zhang J, Song H, Lin H.

Sci Rep. 2013 Nov 21;3:3239. doi: 10.1038/srep03239.

7.
8.

Meteorological factors and risk of scrub typhus in Guangzhou, southern China, 2006-2012.

Li T, Yang Z, Dong Z, Wang M.

BMC Infect Dis. 2014 Mar 12;14:139. doi: 10.1186/1471-2334-14-139.

9.

The association between diurnal temperature range and childhood bacillary dysentery.

Wen LY, Zhao KF, Cheng J, Wang X, Yang HH, Li KS, Xu ZW, Su H.

Int J Biometeorol. 2016 Feb;60(2):269-76. doi: 10.1007/s00484-015-1023-9. Epub 2015 Jun 5.

PMID:
26045331
10.
11.

Daily temperature change in relation to the risk of childhood bacillary dysentery among different age groups and sexes in a temperate city in China.

Li K, Zhao K, Shi L, Wen L, Yang H, Cheng J, Wang X, Su H.

Public Health. 2016 Feb;131:20-6. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2015.10.011. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

PMID:
26655018
12.

Impact of meteorological factors on the incidence of bacillary dysentery in Beijing, China: A time series analysis (1970-2012).

Yan L, Wang H, Zhang X, Li MY, He J.

PLoS One. 2017 Aug 10;12(8):e0182937. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0182937. eCollection 2017.

13.
15.
16.

Climate variations and bacillary dysentery in northern and southern cities of China.

Zhang Y, Bi P, Hiller JE, Sun Y, Ryan P.

J Infect. 2007 Aug;55(2):194-200. Epub 2007 Jan 26.

PMID:
17258812
17.

Association between the incidence of varicella and meteorological conditions in Jinan, Eastern China, 2012-2014.

Yang Y, Geng X, Liu X, Wang W, Zhang J.

BMC Infect Dis. 2016 Apr 22;16:179. doi: 10.1186/s12879-016-1507-1.

18.

Impacts of ambient temperature on the burden of bacillary dysentery in urban and rural Hefei, China.

Cheng J, Xie MY, Zhao KF, Wu JJ, Xu ZW, Song J, Zhao DS, Li KS, Wang X, Yang HH, Wen LY, Su H, Tong SL.

Epidemiol Infect. 2017 Jun;145(8):1567-1576. doi: 10.1017/S0950268817000280. Epub 2017 Mar 15.

PMID:
28294081
19.

Nonlinear and threshold of the association between meteorological factors and bacillary dysentery in Beijing, China.

Li ZJ, Zhang XJ, Hou XX, Xu S, Zhang JS, Song HB, Lin HL.

Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Dec;143(16):3510-9. doi: 10.1017/S0950268815001156. Epub 2015 Jun 1.

PMID:
26027678
20.

Dengue Fever epidemiological status and relationship with meteorological variables in Guangzhou, Southern China, 2007-2012.

Li TG, Yang ZC, Luo L, DI B, Wang M.

Biomed Environ Sci. 2013 Dec;26(12):994-7. doi: 10.3967/bes2013.036.

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