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Items: 1 to 20 of 100

1.

Timing is everything: Age differences in the cognitive control network are modulated by time of day.

Anderson JA, Campbell KL, Amer T, Grady CL, Hasher L.

Psychol Aging. 2014 Sep;29(3):648-57. doi: 10.1037/a0037243. Epub 2014 Jul 7.

2.

Age differences in the frontoparietal cognitive control network: implications for distractibility.

Campbell KL, Grady CL, Ng C, Hasher L.

Neuropsychologia. 2012 Jul;50(9):2212-23. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2012.05.025. Epub 2012 May 31.

3.

Age and measurement time-of-day effects on speech recognition in noise.

Veneman CE, Gordon-Salant S, Matthews LJ, Dubno JR.

Ear Hear. 2013 May-Jun;34(3):288-99. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0b013e31826d0b81.

4.

Look out-it's your off-peak time of day! Time of day matters more for alerting than for orienting or executive attention.

Knight M, Mather M.

Exp Aging Res. 2013;39(3):305-21. doi: 10.1080/0361073X.2013.779197.

5.

Adapting test timing to the sleep-wake schedule: effects on diurnal neurobehavioral performance changes in young evening and older morning chronotypes.

Schmidt C, Peigneux P, Cajochen C, Collette F.

Chronobiol Int. 2012 May;29(4):482-90. doi: 10.3109/07420528.2012.658984. Epub 2012 Apr 5.

PMID:
22480320
6.

Brain mechanisms underlying the effects of aging on different aspects of selective attention.

Geerligs L, Saliasi E, Maurits NM, Renken RJ, Lorist MM.

Neuroimage. 2014 May 1;91:52-62. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.01.029. Epub 2014 Jan 25.

PMID:
24473095
7.

Distractibility, circadian arousal, and aging: a boundary condition?

Li KZ, Hasher L, Jonas D, Rahhal TA, May CP.

Psychol Aging. 1998 Dec;13(4):574-83.

PMID:
9883458
8.

Paying attention to time as one gets older.

Lustig C, Meck WH.

Psychol Sci. 2001 Nov;12(6):478-84.

PMID:
11760135
9.

Age-related shifts in brain activity dynamics during task switching.

Jimura K, Braver TS.

Cereb Cortex. 2010 Jun;20(6):1420-31. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhp206. Epub 2009 Oct 5.

10.

Double dissociation: circadian off-peak times increase emotional reactivity; aging impairs emotion regulation via reappraisal.

Tucker AM, Feuerstein R, Mende-Siedlecki P, Ochsner KN, Stern Y.

Emotion. 2012 Oct;12(5):869-74. doi: 10.1037/a0028207. Epub 2012 May 28.

11.

Conceptual processing of distractors by older but not younger adults.

Amer T, Hasher L.

Psychol Sci. 2014 Dec;25(12):2252-8. doi: 10.1177/0956797614555725. Epub 2014 Nov 6.

PMID:
25376192
12.

The influence of time of testing on interference, working memory, processing speed, and vocabulary: age differences in adulthood.

Borella E, Ludwig C, Dirk J, de Ribaupierre A.

Exp Aging Res. 2011 Jan;37(1):76-107. doi: 10.1080/0361073X.2011.536744.

PMID:
21240820
13.

Age and synchrony effects in visuospatial working memory.

Rowe G, Hasher L, Turcotte J.

Q J Exp Psychol (Hove). 2009 Oct;62(10):1873-80. doi: 10.1080/17470210902834852. Epub 2009 May 19.

PMID:
19459136
14.

Age-related increase in cross-sensory noise in resting and steady-state cerebral perfusion.

Hugenschmidt CE, Mozolic JL, Tan H, Kraft RA, Laurienti PJ.

Brain Topogr. 2009 May;21(3-4):241-51. doi: 10.1007/s10548-009-0098-1. Epub 2009 May 5.

15.

Diurnal patterns of activity of the orienting and executive attention neuronal networks in subjects performing a Stroop-like task: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Marek T, Fafrowicz M, Golonka K, Mojsa-Kaja J, Oginska H, Tucholska K, Urbanik A, Beldzik E, Domagalik A.

Chronobiol Int. 2010 Jul;27(5):945-58. doi: 10.3109/07420528.2010.489400.

PMID:
20636208
16.

Age and synchrony effects in performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test.

Lehmann CA, Marks AD, Hanstock TL.

Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 Apr;25(4):657-65. doi: 10.1017/S1041610212002013. Epub 2012 Dec 12.

PMID:
23232147
17.

Effects of reaction time variability and age on brain activity during Stroop task performance.

Tam A, Luedke AC, Walsh JJ, Fernandez-Ruiz J, Garcia A.

Brain Imaging Behav. 2015 Sep;9(3):609-18. doi: 10.1007/s11682-014-9323-y.

PMID:
25280971
18.

Prefrontal Engagement and Reduced Default Network Suppression Co-occur and Are Dynamically Coupled in Older Adults: The Default-Executive Coupling Hypothesis of Aging.

Turner GR, Spreng RN.

J Cogn Neurosci. 2015 Dec;27(12):2462-76. doi: 10.1162/jocn_a_00869. Epub 2015 Sep 9.

PMID:
26351864
19.

A neural mechanism underlying memory failure in older adults.

Stevens WD, Hasher L, Chiew KS, Grady CL.

J Neurosci. 2008 Nov 26;28(48):12820-4. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2622-08.2008.

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