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Items: 1 to 20 of 103

1.

It's MORe exciting than mu: crosstalk between mu opioid receptors and glutamatergic transmission in the mesolimbic dopamine system.

Chartoff EH, Connery HS.

Front Pharmacol. 2014 May 27;5:116. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2014.00116. eCollection 2014. Review.

2.

μ-opioid receptors in the stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine activity by ethanol and morphine in Long-Evans rats: a delayed effect of ethanol.

Valenta JP, Job MO, Mangieri RA, Schier CJ, Howard EC, Gonzales RA.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2013 Aug;228(3):389-400. doi: 10.1007/s00213-013-3041-9. Epub 2013 Mar 16.

3.

Direct association of Mu-opioid and NMDA glutamate receptors supports their cross-regulation: molecular implications for opioid tolerance.

Garzón J, Rodríguez-Muñoz M, Sánchez-Blázquez P.

Curr Drug Abuse Rev. 2012 Sep;5(3):199-226. Review.

PMID:
22920535
4.
5.

Role of nucleus accumbens glutamatergic plasticity in drug addiction.

Quintero GC.

Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2013;9:1499-512. doi: 10.2147/NDT.S45963. Epub 2013 Sep 30. Review.

6.
7.

Do pharmacological approaches that prevent opioid tolerance target different elements in the same regulatory machinery?

Garzón J, Rodríguez-Muñoz M, Sánchez-Blázquez P.

Curr Drug Abuse Rev. 2008 Jun;1(2):222-38. Review.

PMID:
19630721
8.

Endogenous opioid systems and alcohol addiction.

Herz A.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 1997 Jan;129(2):99-111. Review.

PMID:
9040115
9.

Morphine withdrawal enhances constitutive μ-opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area.

Meye FJ, van Zessen R, Smidt MP, Adan RA, Ramakers GM.

J Neurosci. 2012 Nov 14;32(46):16120-8. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1572-12.2012.

10.
11.

[Development of opioid tolerance -- molecular mechanisms and clinical consequences].

Freye E, Latasch L.

Anasthesiol Intensivmed Notfallmed Schmerzther. 2003 Jan;38(1):14-26. Review. German.

PMID:
12522725
12.

Acute and chronic heroin dependence in mice: contribution of opioid and excitatory amino acid receptors.

Klein G, Juni A, Arout CA, Waxman AR, Inturrisi CE, Kest B.

Eur J Pharmacol. 2008 May 31;586(1-3):179-88. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.02.035. Epub 2008 Feb 19.

14.

Differential effects of gestational buprenorphine, naloxone, and methadone on mesolimbic mu opioid and ORL1 receptor G protein coupling.

Hou Y, Tan Y, Belcheva MM, Clark AL, Zahm DS, Coscia CJ.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res. 2004 Jul 19;151(1-2):149-57.

PMID:
15246701
15.

Role of mu- and delta-opioid receptors in the nucleus accumbens in cocaine-seeking behavior.

Simmons D, Self DW.

Neuropsychopharmacology. 2009 Jul;34(8):1946-57. doi: 10.1038/npp.2009.28. Epub 2009 Mar 11.

16.
17.

Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2012.

Bodnar RJ.

Peptides. 2013 Dec;50:55-95. doi: 10.1016/j.peptides.2013.10.001. Epub 2013 Oct 12. Review.

PMID:
24126281
19.

Activation of mu- and delta-opioid receptors causes presynaptic inhibition of glutamatergic excitation in neocortical neurons.

Ostermeier AM, Schlösser B, Schwender D, Sutor B.

Anesthesiology. 2000 Oct;93(4):1053-63.

PMID:
11020761
20.

Opioids and the management of chronic severe pain in the elderly: consensus statement of an International Expert Panel with focus on the six clinically most often used World Health Organization Step III opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone).

Pergolizzi J, Böger RH, Budd K, Dahan A, Erdine S, Hans G, Kress HG, Langford R, Likar R, Raffa RB, Sacerdote P.

Pain Pract. 2008 Jul-Aug;8(4):287-313. doi: 10.1111/j.1533-2500.2008.00204.x. Epub 2008 May 23.

PMID:
18503626

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