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Items: 1 to 20 of 95

1.

A developmental pathway from early life stress to inflammation: the role of negative health behaviors.

Raposa EB, Bower JE, Hammen CL, Najman JM, Brennan PA.

Psychol Sci. 2014 Jun;25(6):1268-74. doi: 10.1177/0956797614530570. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

2.

Childhood adversity and inflammatory processes in youth: a prospective study.

Slopen N, Kubzansky LD, McLaughlin KA, Koenen KC.

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2013 Feb;38(2):188-200. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2012.05.013. Epub 2012 Jun 21.

3.

Early origins of inflammation: An examination of prenatal and childhood social adversity in a prospective cohort study.

Slopen N, Loucks EB, Appleton AA, Kawachi I, Kubzansky LD, Non AL, Buka S, Gilman SE.

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015 Jan;51:403-13. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.10.016. Epub 2014 Oct 25.

4.

Early life stress and inflammatory mechanisms of fatigue in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study.

Cho HJ, Bower JE, Kiefe CI, Seeman TE, Irwin MR.

Brain Behav Immun. 2012 Aug;26(6):859-65. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2012.04.005. Epub 2012 Apr 25.

5.

Interrelationship of depression, stress and inflammation in cancer patients: a preliminary study.

Archer JA, Hutchison IL, Dorudi S, Stansfeld SA, Korszun A.

J Affect Disord. 2012 Dec 20;143(1-3):39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2012.05.023. Epub 2012 Jul 30.

PMID:
22854100
6.

From childhood trauma to elevated C-reactive protein in adulthood: the role of anxiety and emotional eating.

Schrepf A, Markon K, Lutgendorf SK.

Psychosom Med. 2014 Jun;76(5):327-36. doi: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000072.

PMID:
24933013
7.

Close Friends' Psychopathology as a Pathway From Early Adversity to Young Adulthood Depressive Symptoms.

Raposa EB, Hammen CL, Brennan PA.

J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2015;44(5):742-50. doi: 10.1080/15374416.2014.910788. Epub 2014 May 28.

8.

Associations of childhood adversity and adulthood trauma with C-reactive protein: A cross-sectional population-based study.

Lin JE, Neylan TC, Epel E, O'Donovan A.

Brain Behav Immun. 2016 Mar;53:105-112. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2015.11.015. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

9.

Childhood adversity and inflammation in breast cancer survivors.

Crosswell AD, Bower JE, Ganz PA.

Psychosom Med. 2014 Apr;76(3):208-14. doi: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000041.

10.

Do environments in infancy moderate the association between stress and inflammation in adulthood? Initial evidence from a birth cohort in the Philippines.

McDade TW, Hoke M, Borja JB, Adair LS, Kuzawa C.

Brain Behav Immun. 2013 Jul;31:23-30. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2012.08.010. Epub 2012 Aug 31.

11.

Relationship of early life stress and psychological functioning to adult C-reactive protein in the coronary artery risk development in young adults study.

Taylor SE, Lehman BJ, Kiefe CI, Seeman TE.

Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Oct 15;60(8):819-24. Epub 2006 May 19.

PMID:
16712805
12.

Affective reactivity to daily stressors is associated with elevated inflammation.

Sin NL, Graham-Engeland JE, Ong AD, Almeida DM.

Health Psychol. 2015 Dec;34(12):1154-65. doi: 10.1037/hea0000240. Epub 2015 Jun 1.

13.

Persistent inflammation and its relationship to leptin and insulin in phases of bipolar disorder from acute depression to full remission.

Tsai SY, Chung KH, Huang SH, Chen PH, Lee HC, Kuo CJ.

Bipolar Disord. 2014 Dec;16(8):800-8. doi: 10.1111/bdi.12240. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

PMID:
25130211
14.

Life course socioeconomic position and C-reactive protein: mediating role of health-risk behaviors and metabolic alterations. The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

Camelo LV, Giatti L, Neves JA, Lotufo PA, BenseƱor IM, Chor D, Griep RH, da Fonseca Mde J, Vidigal PG, Kawachi I, Schmidt MI, Barreto SM.

PLoS One. 2014 Oct 13;9(10):e108426. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108426. eCollection 2014.

15.

Early adversity and health outcomes in young adulthood: the role of ongoing stress.

Raposa EB, Hammen CL, Brennan PA, O'Callaghan F, Najman JM.

Health Psychol. 2014 May;33(5):410-8. doi: 10.1037/a0032752. Epub 2013 Jun 3.

16.

Additive contributions of childhood adversity and recent stressors to inflammation at midlife: Findings from the MIDUS study.

Hostinar CE, Lachman ME, Mroczek DK, Seeman TE, Miller GE.

Dev Psychol. 2015 Nov;51(11):1630-44. doi: 10.1037/dev0000049. Epub 2015 Sep 21.

17.

Are stressful developmental processes of youths leading to health problems amplified by genetic polymorphisms? The case of body mass index.

Wickrama KK, O'Neal CW, Oshri A.

J Youth Adolesc. 2014 Jul;43(7):1096-109. doi: 10.1007/s10964-014-0109-8. Epub 2014 Mar 8.

PMID:
24609842
18.

Socioeconomic indices as independent correlates of C-reactive protein in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

Brummett BH, Babyak MA, Singh A, Jiang R, Williams RB, Harris KM, Siegler IC.

Psychosom Med. 2013 Nov-Dec;75(9):882-93. doi: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000005. Epub 2013 Oct 25.

19.

Differential association of somatic and cognitive symptoms of depression and anxiety with inflammation: findings from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA).

Duivis HE, Vogelzangs N, Kupper N, de Jonge P, Penninx BW.

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2013 Sep;38(9):1573-85. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2013.01.002. Epub 2013 Feb 8.

20.

Inflammation: depression fans the flames and feasts on the heat.

Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Derry HM, Fagundes CP.

Am J Psychiatry. 2015 Nov 1;172(11):1075-91. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2015.15020152. Epub 2015 Sep 11. Review.

PMID:
26357876

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