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Items: 1 to 20 of 239

1.

Breeding sex ratios in adult leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) may compensate for female-biased hatchling sex ratios.

Stewart KR, Dutton PH.

PLoS One. 2014 Feb 4;9(2):e88138. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0088138.

2.

Breeding periodicity for male sea turtles, operational sex ratios, and implications in the face of climate change.

Hays GC, Fossette S, Katselidis KA, Schofield G, Gravenor MB.

Conserv Biol. 2010 Dec;24(6):1636-43. doi: 10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01531.x.

PMID:
20497201
3.

Reconstruction of paternal genotypes over multiple breeding seasons reveals male green turtles do not breed annually.

Wright LI, Fuller WJ, Godley BJ, McGowan A, Tregenza T, Broderick AC.

Mol Ecol. 2012 Jul;21(14):3625-35. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2012.05616.x.

PMID:
22591073
4.

The leatherback turtle, Dermochelys coriacea, exhibits both polyandry and polygyny.

Crim JL, Spotila LD, Spotila JR, O'Connor M, Reina R, Williams CJ, Paladino FV.

Mol Ecol. 2002 Oct;11(10):2097-106.

PMID:
12296951
5.

Sex ratio estimations of loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings by histological examination and nest temperatures at Fethiye beach, Turkey.

Kaska Y, Ilgaz C, Ozdemir A, Başkale E, Türkozan O, Baran I, Stachowitsch M.

Naturwissenschaften. 2006 Jul;93(7):338-43.

PMID:
16688438
6.

Turtle mating patterns buffer against disruptive effects of climate change.

Wright LI, Stokes KL, Fuller WJ, Godley BJ, McGowan A, Snape R, Tregenza T, Broderick AC.

Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Jun 7;279(1736):2122-7. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.2285.

8.

Chapter 2. Vulnerability of marine turtles to climate change.

Poloczanska ES, Limpus CJ, Hays GC.

Adv Mar Biol. 2009;56:151-211. doi: 10.1016/S0065-2881(09)56002-6.

PMID:
19895975
9.

Climate change and temperature-dependent sex determination: can individual plasticity in nesting phenology prevent extreme sex ratios?

Schwanz LE, Janzen FJ.

Physiol Biochem Zool. 2008 Nov-Dec;81(6):826-34. doi: 10.1086/590220.

PMID:
18831689
10.

Assignment tests, telemetry and tag-recapture data converge to identify natal origins of leatherback turtles foraging in Atlantic Canadian waters.

Stewart KR, James MC, Roden S, Dutton PH.

J Anim Ecol. 2013 Jul;82(4):791-803. doi: 10.1111/1365-2656.12056.

PMID:
23464527
11.
12.

Predicting the impacts of climate change on a globally distributed species: the case of the loggerhead turtle.

Witt MJ, Hawkes LA, Godfrey MH, Godley BJ, Broderick AC.

J Exp Biol. 2010 Mar 15;213(6):901-11. doi: 10.1242/jeb.038133.

13.

Manipulation of offspring sex ratio by second-mated female house wrens.

Albrecht DJ, Johnson LS.

Proc Biol Sci. 2002 Mar 7;269(1490):461-5.

14.

Reconstructing paternal genotypes to infer patterns of sperm storage and sexual selection in the hawksbill turtle.

Phillips KP, Jorgensen TH, Jolliffe KG, Jolliffe SM, Henwood J, Richardson DS.

Mol Ecol. 2013 Apr;22(8):2301-12. doi: 10.1111/mec.12235.

PMID:
23379838
16.

Microsatellites provide insight into contrasting mating patterns in arribada vs. non-arribada olive ridley sea turtle rookeries.

Jensen MP, Abreu-Grobois FA, Frydenberg J, Loeschcke V.

Mol Ecol. 2006 Aug;15(9):2567-75.

PMID:
16842427
17.

Deforestation: risk of sex ratio distortion in hawksbill sea turtles.

Kamel SJ, Mrosovsky N.

Ecol Appl. 2006 Jun;16(3):923-31.

PMID:
16826992
18.

Comparative health assessment of Western Pacific leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) foraging off the coast of California, 2005-2007.

Harris HS, Benson SR, Gilardi KV, Poppenga RH, Work TM, Dutton PH, Mazet JA.

J Wildl Dis. 2011 Apr;47(2):321-37.

PMID:
21441185
20.

Recent demographic history and present fine-scale structure in the Northwest Atlantic leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) turtle population.

Molfetti E, Vilaça ST, Georges JY, Plot V, Delcroix E, Le Scao R, Lavergne A, Barrioz S, dos Santos FR, de Thoisy B.

PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e58061. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058061.

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