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Items: 1 to 20 of 192

1.

Identification of a pharmacological target for genioglossus reactivation throughout sleep.

Grace KP, Hughes SW, Horner RL.

Sleep. 2014 Jan 1;37(1):41-50. doi: 10.5665/sleep.3304.

2.

Identification of the mechanism mediating genioglossus muscle suppression in REM sleep.

Grace KP, Hughes SW, Horner RL.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Feb 1;187(3):311-9. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201209-1654OC. Epub 2012 Dec 6.

PMID:
23220910
3.

K+ channel modulation causes genioglossus inhibition in REM sleep and is a strategy for reactivation.

Grace KP, Hughes SW, Shahabi S, Horner RL.

Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2013 Sep 15;188(3):277-88. doi: 10.1016/j.resp.2013.07.011. Epub 2013 Jul 18. Review.

PMID:
23872455
4.

Endogenous excitatory drive modulating respiratory muscle activity across sleep-wake states.

Chan E, Steenland HW, Liu H, Horner RL.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2006 Dec 1;174(11):1264-73. Epub 2006 Aug 24.

PMID:
16931636
5.

Control of genioglossus muscle by sleep state-dependent neuromodulators.

Horner RL.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 2008;605:262-7.

PMID:
18085283
6.

GABAA receptor antagonism at the hypoglossal motor nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity in NREM but not REM sleep.

Morrison JL, Sood S, Liu H, Park E, Nolan P, Horner RL.

J Physiol. 2003 Apr 15;548(Pt 2):569-83. Epub 2003 Feb 28.

7.

Role of inhibitory amino acids in control of hypoglossal motor outflow to genioglossus muscle in naturally sleeping rats.

Morrison JL, Sood S, Liu H, Park E, Liu X, Nolan P, Horner RL.

J Physiol. 2003 Nov 1;552(Pt 3):975-91. Epub 2003 Aug 22.

8.
9.

Respiratory motor activity: influence of neuromodulators and implications for sleep disordered breathing.

Horner RL.

Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2007 Jan;85(1):155-65. Review.

PMID:
17487255
10.

Application of histamine or serotonin to the hypoglossal nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity across the wake-sleep cycle.

Neuzeret PC, Sakai K, Gormand F, Petitjean T, Buda C, Sastre JP, Parrot S, Guidon G, Lin JS.

J Sleep Res. 2009 Mar;18(1):113-21. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2869.2008.00708.x.

11.
12.

Sleep-wake control of the upper airway by noradrenergic neurons, with and without intermittent hypoxia.

Kubin L.

Prog Brain Res. 2014;209:255-74. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63274-6.00013-8.

13.

Endogenous glutamatergic control of rhythmically active mammalian respiratory motoneurons in vivo.

Steenland HW, Liu H, Horner RL.

J Neurosci. 2008 Jul 2;28(27):6826-35. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1019-08.2008.

14.

Upper Airway Collapsibility (Pcrit) and Pharyngeal Dilator Muscle Activity are Sleep Stage Dependent.

Carberry JC, Jordan AS, White DP, Wellman A, Eckert DJ.

Sleep. 2016 Mar 1;39(3):511-21. doi: 10.5665/sleep.5516.

15.

Asynchrony of lingual muscle recruitment during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea.

Dotan Y, Pillar G, Schwartz AR, Oliven A.

J Appl Physiol (1985). 2015 Jun 15;118(12):1516-24. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00937.2014. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

16.
17.

Sleep/wake firing patterns of human genioglossus motor units.

Bailey EF, Fridel KW, Rice AD.

J Neurophysiol. 2007 Dec;98(6):3284-91. Epub 2007 Oct 10.

18.

Differential effect of sleep-wake states on lingual and dorsal neck muscle activity in rats.

Lu JW, Mann GL, Ross RJ, Morrison AR, Kubin L.

Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2005 Jul 28;147(2-3):191-203.

PMID:
15964252
19.

The tongue and its control by sleep state-dependent modulators.

Horner RL.

Arch Ital Biol. 2011 Dec 1;149(4):406-25. doi: 10.4449/aib.v149i4.1256. Review.

PMID:
22205590
20.

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