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Items: 1 to 20 of 157

1.

The whole is more than the sum of all its parts: collective effect of spider attachment organs.

Wohlfart E, Wolff JO, Arzt E, Gorb SN.

J Exp Biol. 2014 Jan 15;217(Pt 2):222-4. doi: 10.1242/jeb.093468.

2.

Radial arrangement of Janus-like setae permits friction control in spiders.

Wolff JO, Gorb SN.

Sci Rep. 2013;3:1101. doi: 10.1038/srep01101. Epub 2013 Jan 22.

3.

Friction and adhesion in the tarsal and metatarsal scopulae of spiders.

Niederegger S, Gorb SN.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2006 Nov;192(11):1223-32. Epub 2006 Jul 25.

PMID:
16865371
4.

Comparison of smooth and hairy attachment pads in insects: friction, adhesion and mechanisms for direction-dependence.

Bullock JM, Drechsler P, Federle W.

J Exp Biol. 2008 Oct;211(Pt 20):3333-43. doi: 10.1242/jeb.020941.

5.

Adhesive foot pads: an adaptation to climbing? An ecological survey in hunting spiders.

Wolff JO, Gorb SN.

Zoology (Jena). 2015 Feb;118(1):1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.zool.2014.04.006. Epub 2014 Aug 2.

PMID:
25156934
6.

Adhesive and frictional properties of tarsal attachment pads in two species of stick insects (Phasmatodea) with smooth and nubby euplantulae.

Busshardt P, Wolf H, Gorb SN.

Zoology (Jena). 2012 Jun;115(3):135-41. doi: 10.1016/j.zool.2011.11.002. Epub 2012 May 9.

PMID:
22578997
7.

Surface roughness effects on attachment ability of the spider Philodromus dispar (Araneae, Philodromidae).

Wolff JO, Gorb SN.

J Exp Biol. 2012 Jan 1;215(Pt 1):179-84. doi: 10.1242/jeb.061507.

8.

On Heels and Toes: How Ants Climb with Adhesive Pads and Tarsal Friction Hair Arrays.

Endlein T, Federle W.

PLoS One. 2015 Nov 11;10(11):e0141269. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0141269. eCollection 2015.

9.

Biomechanics of smooth adhesive pads in insects: influence of tarsal secretion on attachment performance.

Drechsler P, Federle W.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2006 Nov;192(11):1213-22. Epub 2006 Jul 12.

PMID:
16835787
10.
11.

Adhesion measurements on the attachment devices of the jumping spider Evarcha arcuata.

Kesel AB, Martin A, Seidl T.

J Exp Biol. 2003 Aug;206(Pt 16):2733-8.

12.

Functional anatomy of the pretarsus in whip spiders (Arachnida, Amblypygi).

Wolff JO, Seiter M, Gorb SN.

Arthropod Struct Dev. 2015 Nov;44(6 Pt A):524-40. doi: 10.1016/j.asd.2015.08.014. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

PMID:
26386460
13.

Pushing versus pulling: division of labour between tarsal attachment pads in cockroaches.

Clemente CJ, Federle W.

Proc Biol Sci. 2008 Jun 7;275(1640):1329-36. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2007.1660.

14.

Why are so many adhesive pads hairy?

Federle W.

J Exp Biol. 2006 Jul;209(Pt 14):2611-21.

15.

Friction ridges in cockroach climbing pads: anisotropy of shear stress measured on transparent, microstructured substrates.

Clemente CJ, Dirks JH, Barbero DR, Steiner U, Federle W.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2009 Sep;195(9):805-14. doi: 10.1007/s00359-009-0457-0. Epub 2009 Jul 1.

PMID:
19568755
16.

Rapid preflexes in smooth adhesive pads of insects prevent sudden detachment.

Endlein T, Federle W.

Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Feb 27;280(1757):20122868. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.2868. Print 2013 Apr 22.

17.

The influence of humidity on the attachment ability of the spider Philodromus dispar (Araneae, Philodromidae).

Wolff JO, Gorb SN.

Proc Biol Sci. 2012 Jan 7;279(1726):139-43. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.0505. Epub 2011 May 18.

18.

Frictional adhesion of patterned surfaces and implications for gecko and biomimetic systems.

Zeng H, Pesika N, Tian Y, Zhao B, Chen Y, Tirrell M, Turner KL, Israelachvili JN.

Langmuir. 2009 Jul 7;25(13):7486-95. doi: 10.1021/la900877h.

PMID:
19522483
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