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Items: 1 to 20 of 86

1.

Attitudes and Practices on the Consent Process and Decision-making for Intravenous Stroke Thrombolysis: Physicians' Perspective.

Talabucon LP, Menon S, Toh AJ, Oh DC, De Silva DA.

Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2013 Nov;42(11):567-74.

2.

Surveys of Stroke Patients and Their Next of Kin on Their Opinions towards Decision-Making and Consent for Stroke Thrombolysis.

Angamuthu N, Queck KK, Menon S, Ho SS, Ang E, De Silva DA.

Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2017 Feb;46(2):50-63.

3.

Inability to consent does not diminish the desirability of stroke thrombolysis.

Chiong W, Kim AS, Huang IA, Farahany NA, Josephson SA.

Ann Neurol. 2014 Aug;76(2):296-304. doi: 10.1002/ana.24209.

4.
5.

Patients' perceived purpose of clinical informed consent: Mill's individual autonomy model is preferred.

Hammami MM, Al-Gaai EA, Al-Jawarneh Y, Amer H, Hammami MB, Eissa A, Qadire MA.

BMC Med Ethics. 2014 Jan 10;15:2. doi: 10.1186/1472-6939-15-2.

6.

[The origin of informed consent].

Mallardi V.

Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital. 2005 Oct;25(5):312-27. Italian.

PMID:
16602332
7.

Patient-centered informed consent in surgical practice.

Bernat JL, Peterson LM.

Arch Surg. 2006 Jan;141(1):86-92.

PMID:
16415417
8.
9.

Medical decision-making during the guardianship process for incapacitated, hospitalized adults: a descriptive cohort study.

Bandy RJ, Helft PR, Bandy RW, Torke AM.

J Gen Intern Med. 2010 Oct;25(10):1003-8. doi: 10.1007/s11606-010-1351-8.

10.

Consent for intravenous thrombolysis in acute stroke: review and future directions.

White-Bateman SR, Schumacher HC, Sacco RL, Appelbaum PS.

Arch Neurol. 2007 Jun;64(6):785-92. Review.

PMID:
17562926
11.

Life support for patients without a surrogate decision maker: who decides?

White DB, Curtis JR, Wolf LE, Prendergast TJ, Taichman DB, Kuniyoshi G, Acerra F, Lo B, Luce JM.

Ann Intern Med. 2007 Jul 3;147(1):34-40.

PMID:
17606959
12.
13.

Consent to thrombolysis in acute ischaemic stroke: from trial to practice.

Ciccone A.

Lancet Neurol. 2003 Jun;2(6):375-8.

PMID:
12849154
14.

Factors that influence variation in clinical decision-making about thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke: results of a discrete choice experiment.

Thomson RG, De BrĂșn A, Flynn D, Ternent L, Price CI, Rodgers H, Ford GA, Rudd M, Lancsar E, Simpson S, Teah J.

Southampton (UK): NIHR Journals Library; 2017 Jan.

16.

Ethical issues of informed consent in acute stroke. Analysis of the modalities of consent in 56 patients enrolled in urgent therapeutic trials.

Demarquay G, Derex L, Nighoghossian N, Adeleine P, Philippeau F, Honnorat J, Trouillas P.

Cerebrovasc Dis. 2005;19(2):65-8.

PMID:
15644623
17.

Risk communication in the hyperacute setting of stroke thrombolysis: an interview study of clinicians.

Lie ML, Murtagh MJ, Watson DB, Jenkings KN, Mackintosh J, Ford GA, Thomson RG.

Emerg Med J. 2015 May;32(5):357-63. doi: 10.1136/emermed-2014-203717.

PMID:
24838424
18.

Ethical decision making and patient autonomy: a comparison of physicians and patients in Japan and the United States.

Ruhnke GW, Wilson SR, Akamatsu T, Kinoue T, Takashima Y, Goldstein MK, Koenig BA, Hornberger JC, Raffin TA.

Chest. 2000 Oct;118(4):1172-82.

PMID:
11035693
19.

Informed consent and incompetent medical patients.

Munetz MR, Lidz CW, Meisel A.

J Fam Pract. 1985 Mar;20(3):273-9.

PMID:
3156207
20.

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