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Items: 1 to 20 of 106

2.

Antivenom for Neuromuscular Paralysis Resulting From Snake Envenoming.

Silva A, Hodgson WC, Isbister GK.

Toxins (Basel). 2017 Apr 19;9(4). pii: E143. doi: 10.3390/toxins9040143. Review.

3.

Neurological complications of venomous snake bites: a review.

Del Brutto OH, Del Brutto VJ.

Acta Neurol Scand. 2012 Jun;125(6):363-72. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2011.01593.x. Epub 2011 Oct 15. Review.

PMID:
21999367
4.
5.

In vitro neuromuscular activity of snake venoms.

Hodgson WC, Wickramaratna JC.

Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2002 Sep;29(9):807-14. Review.

PMID:
12165047
6.

Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the presynaptic toxicity of secreted phospholipases A(2): an update.

Šribar J, Oberčkal J, Križaj I.

Toxicon. 2014 Oct;89:9-16. doi: 10.1016/j.toxicon.2014.06.019. Epub 2014 Jul 5. Review.

PMID:
25009088
7.

Neurotoxins with phospholipase A2 activity in snake venoms.

Chang CC.

Proc Natl Sci Counc Repub China B. 1985 Apr;9(2):126-42. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
2996044
8.

Inflammatory effects of snake venom myotoxic phospholipases A2.

Teixeira CF, Landucci EC, Antunes E, Chacur M, Cury Y.

Toxicon. 2003 Dec 15;42(8):947-62. Review.

PMID:
15019493
9.

Myotoxic phospholipases A2 and the regeneration of skeletal muscles.

Harris JB.

Toxicon. 2003 Dec 15;42(8):933-45. Review.

PMID:
15019492
11.

Search for a "toxic site" in snake venom phospholipases A2.

Arriagada E, Cid H.

Arch Biol Med Exp (Santiago). 1989 Jul;22(2):97-105.

PMID:
2515808
12.

Preclinical efficacy of Australian antivenoms against the venom of the small-eyed snake, Micropechis ikaheka, from Papua New Guinea: an antivenomics and neutralization study.

Pla D, Paiva OK, Sanz L, Beutler M, Wright CE, Calvete JJ, Williams DJ, Gutiérrez JM.

J Proteomics. 2014 Oct 14;110:198-208. doi: 10.1016/j.jprot.2014.06.016. Epub 2014 Jun 28.

PMID:
24980637
13.

The greater black krait (Bungarus niger), a newly recognized cause of neuro-myotoxic snake bite envenoming in Bangladesh.

Faiz A, Ghose A, Ahsan F, Rahman R, Amin R, Hassan MU, Chowdhury AW, Kuch U, Rocha T, Harris JB, Theakston RD, Warrell DA.

Brain. 2010 Nov;133(11):3181-93. doi: 10.1093/brain/awq265. Epub 2010 Sep 20.

PMID:
20855420
14.

Screening of snake venoms for neurotoxic and myotoxic effects using simple in vitro preparations from rodents and chicks.

Harvey AL, Barfaraz A, Thomson E, Faiz A, Preston S, Harris JB.

Toxicon. 1994 Mar;32(3):257-65.

PMID:
8016848
15.

Identification of phospholipase A2 and neurotoxic activities in the venom of the New Guinean small-eyed snake (Micropechis ikaheka).

Geh SL, Vincent A, Rang S, Abrahams T, Jacobson L, Lang B, Warrell D.

Toxicon. 1997 Jan;35(1):101-9.

PMID:
9028013
16.

From Fangs to Pharmacology: The Future of Snakebite Envenoming Therapy.

Laustsen AH, Engmark M, Milbo C, Johannesen J, Lomonte B, Gutiérrez JM, Lohse B.

Curr Pharm Des. 2016;22(34):5270-5293. Review.

PMID:
27339430
17.

Differential myotoxic and cytotoxic activities of pre-synaptic neurotoxins from Papuan taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) and Irian Jayan death adder (Acanthophis rugosus) venoms.

Chaisakul J, Parkington HC, Isbister GK, Konstantakopoulos N, Hodgson WC.

Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2013 May;112(5):325-34. doi: 10.1111/bcpt.12048. Epub 2013 Feb 23.

18.
19.

The effects of five phospholipases A2 from the venom of king brown snake, Pseudechis australis, on nerve and muscle.

Fatehi M, Rowan EG, Harvey AL, Harris JB.

Toxicon. 1994 Dec;32(12):1559-72.

PMID:
7725325
20.

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