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Items: 1 to 20 of 77

1.

The next generation of obesity treatments: beyond suppressing appetite.

Avena NM, Murray S, Gold MS.

Front Psychol. 2013 Oct 9;4:721. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00721. eCollection 2013. No abstract available.

2.

The development of tolerance to drugs that suppress food intake.

Fernstrom JD, Choi S.

Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Jan;117(1):105-22. Epub 2007 Sep 20. Review.

PMID:
17950459
4.

Low control over palatable food intake in rats is associated with habitual behavior and relapse vulnerability: individual differences.

de Jong JW, Meijboom KE, Vanderschuren LJ, Adan RA.

PLoS One. 2013 Sep 10;8(9):e74645. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0074645. eCollection 2013.

5.

Using stop signals to reduce impulsive choices for palatable unhealthy foods.

Veling H, Aarts H, Stroebe W.

Br J Health Psychol. 2013 May;18(2):354-68. doi: 10.1111/j.2044-8287.2012.02092.x. Epub 2012 Sep 27.

PMID:
23017096
6.

Effect of calories on appetite for palatable food in obese and nonobese humans.

Wooley OW, Wooley SC, Woods WA.

J Comp Physiol Psychol. 1975 Aug;89(6):619-25.

PMID:
1194463
7.

The Influence of Palatable Diets in Reward System Activation: A Mini Review.

de Macedo IC, de Freitas JS, da Silva Torres IL.

Adv Pharmacol Sci. 2016;2016:7238679. doi: 10.1155/2016/7238679. Epub 2016 Mar 20. Review.

8.

Appetite suppressants as adjuncts in the treatment of obesity.

Elks ML.

J Fam Pract. 1996 Mar;42(3):287-92. Review. Erratum in: J Fam Pract 1996 May;42(5):532.

PMID:
8636681
9.

Stimulants for the Control of Hedonic Appetite.

Poulton AS, Hibbert EJ, Champion BL, Nanan RK.

Front Pharmacol. 2016 Apr 25;7:105. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2016.00105. eCollection 2016.

10.

Pharmacology of appetite suppression.

Halford JC, Blundell JE.

Prog Drug Res. 2000;54:25-58. Review.

PMID:
10857385
11.

The use of appetite suppressants among health sciences undergraduate students in Southern Brazil.

Zubaran C, Lazzaretti R.

Einstein (Sao Paulo). 2013 Jan-Mar;11(1):47-52. English, Portuguese.

12.

Obesity as an addiction: Why do the obese eat more?

von Deneen KM, Liu Y.

Maturitas. 2011 Apr;68(4):342-5. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.01.018. Epub 2011 Mar 3. Review.

PMID:
21376484
13.

Appetite suppressants in pregnancy.

Manakova E, Kralova T, Hubičková Heringová L.

Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2012;33 Suppl 3:179-82.

PMID:
23353864
15.

Towards an animal model of food addiction.

de Jong JW, Vanderschuren LJ, Adan RA.

Obes Facts. 2012;5(2):180-95. doi: 10.1159/000338292. Epub 2012 Apr 19. Review.

16.

Appetite control and obesity.

Wadikar DD, Premavalli KS.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2012;52(10):949-56. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2010.514757. Review.

PMID:
22747082
17.

D1 and D2 antagonists reverse the effects of appetite suppressants on weight loss, food intake, locomotion, and rebalance spiking inhibition in the rat NAc shell.

Kalyanasundar B, Perez CI, Luna A, Solorio J, Moreno MG, Elias D, Simon SA, Gutierrez R.

J Neurophysiol. 2015 Jul;114(1):585-607. doi: 10.1152/jn.00012.2015. Epub 2015 May 13.

18.

Inhibiting food reward: delay discounting, food reward sensitivity, and palatable food intake in overweight and obese women.

Appelhans BM, Woolf K, Pagoto SL, Schneider KL, Whited MC, Liebman R.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Nov;19(11):2175-82. doi: 10.1038/oby.2011.57. Epub 2011 Apr 7.

19.

[Anti-obesity drugs--mechanism and medical indication of appetite suppressants].

Nishida M.

Nihon Rinsho. 2001 Mar;59(3):620-4. Review. Japanese.

PMID:
11268619
20.

Stop signals decrease choices for palatable foods through decreased food evaluation.

Veling H, Aarts H, Stroebe W.

Front Psychol. 2013 Nov 26;4:875. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00875. eCollection 2013.

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