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Items: 1 to 20 of 88

1.

Map fragmentation in two- and three-dimensional environments.

Yamahachi H, Moser MB, Moser EI.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):569-71; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103625
2.

Navigating in a three-dimensional world.

Jeffery KJ, Jovalekic A, Verriotis M, Hayman R.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):523-43. Review.

PMID:
24103594
3.
4.

Navigating in a volumetric world: metric encoding in the vertical axis of space.

Burt de Perera T, Holbrook R, Davis V, Kacelnik A, Guilford T.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):546-7; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103599
5.

The planar mosaic fails to account for spatially directed action.

Klatzky RL, Giudice NA.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):554-5; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103608
6.

The complex interplay between three-dimensional egocentric and allocentric spatial representation.

Kaplan DM.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):553-4; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103607
7.

What counts as the evidence for three-dimensional and four-dimensional spatial representations?

Wang RF, Street WN.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):567-8; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103623
8.

Does evidence from ethology support bicoded cognitive maps?

Zappettini S, Allen C.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):570-1; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103626
9.

The study of blindness and technology can reveal the mechanisms of three-dimensional navigation.

Pasqualotto A, Proulx MJ.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):559-60; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103614
10.

Just the tip of the iceberg: the bicoded map is but one instantiation of scalable spatial representation structures.

Schultheis H, Barkowsky T.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):565-6; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103620
11.

Applying the bicoded spatial model to nonhuman primates in an arboreal multilayer environment.

Howard AM, Fragaszy DM.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):552-3; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103606
12.

Semantic sides of three-dimensional space representation.

Badets A.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):543; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103595
13.

Augmented topological maps for three-dimensional navigation.

Peremans H, Vanderelst D.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):560-1; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103615
14.

The problem of conflicting reference frames when investigating three-dimensional space in surface-dwelling animals.

Savelli F, Knierim JJ.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):564-5; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103619
15.

Monkeys in space: primate neural data suggest volumetric representations.

Lehky SR, Sereno AB, Sereno ME.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):555-6; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103609
16.

Anisotropy and polarization of space: evidence from naïve optics and phenomenological psychophysics.

Bianchi I, Bertamini M.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):545-6; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103598
17.

Human path navigation in a three-dimensional world.

Barnett-Cowan M, Bülthoff HH.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):544-5; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103596
18.

Which animal model for understanding human navigation in a three-dimensional world?

Orban GA.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):558-9; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103613
19.

Spatial language as a window on representations of three-dimensional space.

Holmes KJ, Wolff P.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):550-1; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103604
20.

Learning to navigate in a three-dimensional world: from bees to primates.

Dyer AG, Rosa MG.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):550; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103603
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