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Items: 1 to 20 of 98

1.

Think local, act global: how do fragmented representations of space allow seamless navigation?

Dudchenko PA, Wood ER, Grieves RM.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):548-9; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103601
2.

Spatial language as a window on representations of three-dimensional space.

Holmes KJ, Wolff P.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):550-1; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103604
3.

The planar mosaic fails to account for spatially directed action.

Klatzky RL, Giudice NA.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):554-5; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103608
4.

Human path navigation in a three-dimensional world.

Barnett-Cowan M, B├╝lthoff HH.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):544-5; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103596
5.

Does evidence from ethology support bicoded cognitive maps?

Zappettini S, Allen C.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):570-1; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103626
6.

The study of blindness and technology can reveal the mechanisms of three-dimensional navigation.

Pasqualotto A, Proulx MJ.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):559-60; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103614
7.

Navigation bicoded as functions of x-y and time?

Phillips G, Ogeil RP.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):561-2; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103616
8.

What is optimized in an optimal path?

Sparks FT, O'Reilly KC, Kubie JL.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):566; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103621
9.

Which animal model for understanding human navigation in a three-dimensional world?

Orban GA.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):558-9; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103613
10.

Vertical and veridical--2.5-dimensional visual and vestibular navigation.

Powers DM.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):562-3; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103617
11.

Semantic sides of three-dimensional space representation.

Badets A.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):543; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103595
12.

Monkeys in space: primate neural data suggest volumetric representations.

Lehky SR, Sereno AB, Sereno ME.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):555-6; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103609
13.

Augmented topological maps for three-dimensional navigation.

Peremans H, Vanderelst D.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):560-1; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103615
14.

Space and context in the temporal cortex.

Bilkey DK.

Hippocampus. 2007;17(9):813-25. Review.

PMID:
17598154
15.

3-D Maps and Compasses in the Brain.

Finkelstein A, Las L, Ulanovsky N.

Annu Rev Neurosci. 2016 Jul 8;39:171-96. doi: 10.1146/annurev-neuro-070815-013831. Review.

PMID:
27442069
16.

Learning to navigate in a three-dimensional world: from bees to primates.

Dyer AG, Rosa MG.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):550; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103603
17.
18.

Perceptual experience as a bridge between the retina and a bicoded cognitive map.

Durgin FH, Li Z.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):549; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103602
19.

Spatial cognition in bats and rats: from sensory acquisition to multiscale maps and navigation.

Geva-Sagiv M, Las L, Yovel Y, Ulanovsky N.

Nat Rev Neurosci. 2015 Feb;16(2):94-108. doi: 10.1038/nrn3888. Review.

PMID:
25601780
20.

What counts as the evidence for three-dimensional and four-dimensional spatial representations?

Wang RF, Street WN.

Behav Brain Sci. 2013 Oct;36(5):567-8; discussion 571-87.

PMID:
24103623

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