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Items: 1 to 20 of 279

1.

Occurrence and transfer of a cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-methylamino-L-alanine within the aquatic food webs of Gonghu Bay (Lake Taihu, China) to evaluate the potential human health risk.

Jiao Y, Chen Q, Chen X, Wang X, Liao X, Jiang L, Wu J, Yang L.

Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jan 15;468-469:457-63. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.08.064. Epub 2013 Sep 19.

PMID:
24055662
2.

Transfer of a cyanobacterial neurotoxin within a temperate aquatic ecosystem suggests pathways for human exposure.

Jonasson S, Eriksson J, Berntzon L, Spácil Z, Ilag LL, Ronnevi LO, Rasmussen U, Bergman B.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 May 18;107(20):9252-7. doi: 10.1073/pnas.0914417107. Epub 2010 May 3.

3.

Detection of the neurotoxin BMAA within cyanobacteria isolated from freshwater in China.

Li A, Tian Z, Li J, Yu R, Banack SA, Wang Z.

Toxicon. 2010 May;55(5):947-53. doi: 10.1016/j.toxicon.2009.09.023. Epub 2009 Oct 12.

PMID:
19822166
4.

The dynamics of toxic and nontoxic Microcystis during bloom in the large shallow lake, Lake Taihu, China.

Li D, Yu Y, Yang Z, Kong F, Zhang T, Tang S.

Environ Monit Assess. 2014 May;186(5):3053-62. doi: 10.1007/s10661-013-3600-x. Epub 2014 Jan 16.

PMID:
24429844
5.
6.

β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) uptake by the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

Esterhuizen M, Pflugmacher S, Downing TG.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2011 Jan;74(1):74-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2010.04.005. Epub 2010 May 5.

PMID:
20447690
7.

Biomagnification of cyanobacterial neurotoxins and neurodegenerative disease among the Chamorro people of Guam.

Cox PA, Banack SA, Murch SJ.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Nov 11;100(23):13380-3.

8.

Nitrogen starvation of cyanobacteria results in the production of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

Downing S, Banack SA, Metcalf JS, Cox PA, Downing TG.

Toxicon. 2011 Aug;58(2):187-94. doi: 10.1016/j.toxicon.2011.05.017. Epub 2011 Jun 16.

PMID:
21704054
9.

Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

Mondo K, Broc Glover W, Murch SJ, Liu G, Cai Y, Davis DA, Mash DC.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2014 Aug;70:26-32. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2014.04.015. Epub 2014 Apr 19.

PMID:
24755394
10.

Detection of cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine within shellfish in the diet of an ALS patient in Florida.

Banack SA, Metcalf JS, Bradley WG, Cox PA.

Toxicon. 2014 Nov;90:167-73. doi: 10.1016/j.toxicon.2014.07.018. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

PMID:
25123936
11.

β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) metabolism in the aquatic macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

Downing S, Esterhuizen-Londt M, Grant Downing T.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2015 Oct;120:88-92. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.05.022. Epub 2015 May 31.

PMID:
26036420
12.

Cyanobacterial neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in shark fins.

Mondo K, Hammerschlag N, Basile M, Pablo J, Banack SA, Mash DC.

Mar Drugs. 2012 Feb;10(2):509-20. doi: 10.3390/md10020509. Epub 2012 Feb 21.

13.

Biotransfer of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) in a eutrophicated freshwater lake.

Lage S, Annadotter H, Rasmussen U, Rydberg S.

Mar Drugs. 2015 Mar 2;13(3):1185-201. doi: 10.3390/md13031185.

14.

[Spatial distribution pattern and stock estimation of nutrients during bloom season in Lake Taihu].

Jin YW, Zhu GW, Xu H, Zhu MY.

Huan Jing Ke Xue. 2015 Mar;36(3):936-45. Chinese.

PMID:
25929061
15.

Detection of cyanotoxins, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine and microcystins, from a lake surrounded by cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Banack SA, Caller T, Henegan P, Haney J, Murby A, Metcalf JS, Powell J, Cox PA, Stommel E.

Toxins (Basel). 2015 Jan 29;7(2):322-36. doi: 10.3390/toxins7020322.

16.

Elucidation of matrix effects and performance of solid-phase extraction for LC-MS/MS analysis of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) neurotoxins in cyanobacteria.

Li A, Fan H, Ma F, McCarron P, Thomas K, Tang X, Quilliam MA.

Analyst. 2012 Mar 7;137(5):1210-9. doi: 10.1039/c2an15887f. Epub 2012 Jan 16.

PMID:
22249403
17.

Bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of mercury in a food web from a large, shallow, hypereutrophic lake (Lake Taihu) in China.

Wang S, Li B, Zhang M, Xing D, Jia Y, Wei C.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2011 Aug;19(7):2820-31. doi: 10.1007/s11356-012-0787-2. Epub 2012 Feb 15.

PMID:
22351254
18.

Controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a hyper-eutrophic lake (Lake Taihu, China): the need for a dual nutrient (N & P) management strategy.

Paerl HW, Xu H, McCarthy MJ, Zhu G, Qin B, Li Y, Gardner WS.

Water Res. 2011 Feb;45(5):1973-83. doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2010.09.018. Epub 2010 Sep 29.

PMID:
20934736
19.

Controlling cyanobacterial blooms in hypertrophic Lake Taihu, China: will nitrogen reductions cause replacement of non-N2 fixing by N2 fixing taxa?

Paerl HW, Xu H, Hall NS, Zhu G, Qin B, Wu Y, Rossignol KL, Dong L, McCarthy MJ, Joyner AR.

PLoS One. 2014 Nov 18;9(11):e113123. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113123. eCollection 2014.

20.

Microcystis genotype succession and related environmental factors in Lake Taihu during cyanobacterial blooms.

Wang X, Sun M, Wang J, Yang L, Luo L, Li P, Kong F.

Microb Ecol. 2012 Nov;64(4):986-99. doi: 10.1007/s00248-012-0083-1. Epub 2012 Jul 4.

PMID:
22760733

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