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Items: 1 to 20 of 105

1.

WHO releases guidelines for treating chemical warfare victims after possible Syria attacks.

Vogel L.

CMAJ. 2013 Oct 1;185(14):E665. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.109-4592. Epub 2013 Sep 3. No abstract available.

2.

What can we learn on medical preparedness from the use of chemical agents against civilians in Syria?

Eisenkraft A, Gilburd D, Kassirer M, Kreiss Y.

Am J Emerg Med. 2014 Feb;32(2):186. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2013.11.005. Epub 2013 Nov 8. No abstract available.

PMID:
24332250
3.

Lest we forget: why the use of chemical weapons must not go unchallenged.

Patrick K, Stanbrook M, Flegel K.

CMAJ. 2013 Oct 15;185(15):1299. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.131359. Epub 2013 Sep 6. No abstract available.

4.

Airborne exposure limits for chemical and biological warfare agents: is everything set and clear?

Sabelnikov A, Zhukov V, Kempf CR.

Int J Environ Health Res. 2006 Aug;16(4):241-53.

PMID:
16854669
5.

As Syria crisis mounts, scientist looks back at last major chemical attack.

Dons D.

Science. 2013 Sep 6;341(6150):1051. doi: 10.1126/science.341.6150.1051. No abstract available.

PMID:
24009366
6.

Chemical warfare in the First World War: reflections 100 years later.

Mangerich A, Esser C.

Arch Toxicol. 2014 Nov;88(11):1909-11. doi: 10.1007/s00204-014-1370-z. Epub 2014 Sep 23. No abstract available.

PMID:
25245084
7.

Chemical warfare agents--still taboo poisons?

Schwenk M, Szinicz L.

Toxicology. 2005 Oct 30;214(3):165-6. No abstract available.

PMID:
16112331
9.

[Chemical and biological warfare].

Cotrău M.

Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 1990 Oct-Dec;94(3-4):653-60. Romanian. No abstract available.

PMID:
2131571
10.

Chemical casualties. Introduction.

[No authors listed]

J R Army Med Corps. 2002 Dec;148(4):329-31. No abstract available.

PMID:
12703419
11.

Lack of atropine in Syria hampers treatment after gas attacks.

Gulland A.

BMJ. 2013 Sep 3;347:f5413. doi: 10.1136/bmj.f5413. No abstract available. Erratum in: BMJ. 2013;347:f5530.

PMID:
24002814
12.

[First chemical mass attack in history of wars, Bolimów, January 31, 1915].

Zieliński A.

Przegl Epidemiol. 2010;64(3):449-53. Polish.

PMID:
20976962
13.
14.

Understanding and treating chlorine-induced lung injury.

Matalon S, Maull EA.

Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2010 Jul;7(4):253. No abstract available.

PMID:
20601627
15.

Waiting to exhale: chaos, toxicity and the origins of the U.S. Chemical Warfare Service.

Ede A.

J Law Med Ethics. 2011 Spring;39(1):28-33. doi: 10.1111/j.1748-720X.2011.00545.x. No abstract available.

PMID:
21314790
16.

When a doctor goes wrong.

Chinthapalli K.

BMJ. 2013 Sep 10;347:f5455. doi: 10.1136/bmj.f5455. No abstract available.

PMID:
24022037
17.

Technological advancements for the detection of and protection against biological and chemical warfare agents.

Eubanks LM, Dickerson TJ, Janda KD.

Chem Soc Rev. 2007 Mar;36(3):458-70. Epub 2007 Jan 11. Review.

PMID:
17325785
18.

Biomaterials for mediation of chemical and biological warfare agents.

Russell AJ, Berberich JA, Drevon GF, Koepsel RR.

Annu Rev Biomed Eng. 2003;5:1-27. Epub 2003 Apr 10. Review.

PMID:
12704086
19.

Medical support in chemical operations.

[No authors listed]

J R Army Med Corps. 2002 Dec;148(4):335-43. No abstract available.

PMID:
12703421
20.

Chemical warfare agents.

Kuca K, Pohanka M.

EXS. 2010;100:543-58. Review.

PMID:
20358695

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