Format
Sort by

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 141

1.

Quinto Tiberio Angelerio and new measures for controlling plague in 16th-century Alghero, Sardinia.

Bianucci R, Benedictow OJ, Fornaciari G, Giuffra V.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2013;19(9):1478-83. doi: 10.3201/eid1909.120311.

2.

Yersinia pestis DNA from skeletal remains from the 6(th) century AD reveals insights into Justinianic Plague.

Harbeck M, Seifert L, Hänsch S, Wagner DM, Birdsell D, Parise KL, Wiechmann I, Grupe G, Thomas A, Keim P, Zöller L, Bramanti B, Riehm JM, Scholz HC.

PLoS Pathog. 2013;9(5):e1003349. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003349.

3.

[The plague from antiquity to today and its final incursions into southern Italy].

Rizzo G, Caroli G.

Ann Ig. 2002 Jan-Feb;14(1 Suppl 1):141-52. Italian. No abstract available.

PMID:
12162129
4.

Reflections on crisis burials related to past plague epidemics.

Signoli M.

Clin Microbiol Infect. 2012 Mar;18(3):218-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-0691.2012.03787.x. Review.

5.

Yersinia pestis Orientalis in remains of ancient plague patients.

Drancourt M, Signoli M, Dang LV, Bizot B, Roux V, Tzortzis S, Raoult D.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2007 Feb;13(2):332-3.

6.

[16th century: suffering and disease on the way to great discoveries; from Lisbon to the Moluccas and to Japan].

Niaussat PM.

Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1999 Dec;92(5 Pt 2):399-404. French.

PMID:
11000948
7.

Genesis of the anti-plague system: the Tsarist period.

Melikishvili A.

Crit Rev Microbiol. 2006;32(1):19-31.

PMID:
16610335
8.

Plague, policy, saints and terrorists: a historical survey.

Lippi D, Conti AA.

J Infect. 2002 May;44(4):226-8.

PMID:
12099728
9.

[A personal view of the history of the genus Yersinia].

Mollaret HH.

Contrib Microbiol Immunol. 1987;9:1-13. French.

PMID:
3311629
10.

The history of the plague and the research on the causative agent Yersinia pestis.

Zietz BP, Dunkelberg H.

Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2004 Feb;207(2):165-78. Review.

PMID:
15031959
11.

[The epidemiological transition and the conquest of plague].

Benedictow OJ.

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Dec 10;114(30):3587-93. Review. Norwegian.

PMID:
7825136
12.

Universal and particular: the language of plague, 1348-1500.

Carmichael AG.

Med Hist Suppl. 2008;(27):17-52. Review. No abstract available.

13.

Plague epidemic in the Kingdom of Naples, 1656-1658.

Scasciamacchia S, Serrecchia L, Giangrossi L, Garofolo G, Balestrucci A, Sammartino G, Fasanella A.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;18(1):186-8. doi: 10.3201/eid1801.110597. No abstract available.

14.

[Health service organization during the age of pestilence. 2].

Sabbatani S.

Infez Med. 2003 Dec;11(4):216-21. Italian.

16.

Small oversights that led to the Great Plague of Marseille (1720-1723): lessons from the past.

Devaux CA.

Infect Genet Evol. 2013 Mar;14:169-85. doi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2012.11.016. Review.

PMID:
23246639
17.

The bubonic plague.

McEvedy C.

Sci Am. 1988 Feb;258(2):118-23.

PMID:
3055286
18.

Adaptive strategies of Yersinia pestis to persist during inter-epizootic and epizootic periods.

Eisen RJ, Gage KL.

Vet Res. 2009 Mar-Apr;40(2):1. doi: 10.1051/vetres:2008039. Review.

19.

Controlling the geographical spread of infectious disease: plague in Italy, 1347-1851.

Cliff AD, Smallman-Raynor MR, Stevens PM.

Acta Med Hist Adriat. 2009;7(2):197-236.

PMID:
20500006
20.

Plague: history and contemporary analysis.

Raoult D, Mouffok N, Bitam I, Piarroux R, Drancourt M.

J Infect. 2013 Jan;66(1):18-26. doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2012.09.010. Review.

PMID:
23041039
Items per page

Supplemental Content

Support Center