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Items: 1 to 20 of 109

1.
2.

Interactions of Hylastes species (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) with Leptographium species associated with loblolly pine decline.

Eckhardt LC, Goyer RA, Klepzig KD, Jones JP.

J Econ Entomol. 2004 Apr;97(2):468-74.

PMID:
15154469
3.

Ecology of root-feeding beetles and their associated fungi on longleaf pine in Georgia.

Zanzot JW, Matusick G, Eckhardt LG.

Environ Entomol. 2010 Apr;39(2):415-23. doi: 10.1603/EN09261.

PMID:
20388270
4.

Colonization Dynamics of Subcortical Insects on Forest Sites With Relatively Stressed and Unstressed Loblolly Pine Trees.

Helbig CE, Coyle DR, Klepzig KD, Nowak JT, Gandhi KJ.

J Econ Entomol. 2016 Aug;109(4):1729-40. doi: 10.1093/jee/tow083. Epub 2016 May 31.

PMID:
27252398
5.

Trap type, chirality of alpha-pinene, and geographic region affect sampling efficiency of root and lower stem insects in pine.

Erbilgin N, Szele A, Klepzig KD, Raffa KF.

J Econ Entomol. 2001 Oct;94(5):1113-21.

PMID:
11681673
7.
8.
9.

Efficacy of two insecticides for protecting loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) from subcortical beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Cerambycidae).

Burke JL, Hanula JL, Horn S, Audley JP, Gandhi KJ.

Pest Manag Sci. 2012 Jul;68(7):1048-52. doi: 10.1002/ps.3266. Epub 2012 Feb 22.

PMID:
22359265
10.

Ethanol and (-)-alpha-Pinene: attractant kairomones for bark and ambrosia beetles in the southeastern US.

Miller DR, Rabaglia RJ.

J Chem Ecol. 2009 Apr;35(4):435-48. doi: 10.1007/s10886-009-9613-9. Epub 2009 Mar 19.

PMID:
19294470
11.
13.

Pre-invasion economic assessment of invasive species prevention: A putative ambrosia beetle in Southeastern loblolly pine forests.

Susaeta A, Soto JR, Adams DC, Hulcr J.

J Environ Manage. 2016 Dec 1;183(Pt 3):875-881. doi: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.09.037. Epub 2016 Sep 21.

PMID:
27665126
15.

Impact of cogongrass management strategies on generalist predators in cogongrass-infested longleaf pine plantations.

Sells SM, Held DW, Enloe SF, Loewenstein NJ, Eckhardt LG.

Pest Manag Sci. 2015 Mar;71(3):478-84. doi: 10.1002/ps.3951. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

PMID:
25463845
16.

Resin flow responses to fertilization, wounding and fungal inoculation in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) in North Carolina.

Knebel L, Robison DJ, Wentworth TR, Klepzig KD.

Tree Physiol. 2008 Jun;28(6):847-53.

PMID:
18381265
17.

Use of systemic fipronil and imidacloprid to control regeneration pests of loblolly pine.

Asaro C, Creighton J.

J Econ Entomol. 2011 Aug;104(4):1272-9.

PMID:
21882692
18.

Evaluation of funnel traps for characterizing the bark beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) communities in ponderosa pine forests of north-central Arizona.

Hayes CJ, DeGomez TE, Clancy KM, Williams KK, McMillin JD, Anhold JA.

J Econ Entomol. 2008 Aug;101(4):1253-65.

PMID:
18767735
19.

Suitability of some southern and western pines as hosts for the pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda (Coleoptera: Scolytidae).

Eager TA, Berisford CW, Dalusky MJ, Nielsen DG, Brewer JW, Hilty SJ, Haack RA.

J Econ Entomol. 2004 Apr;97(2):460-7.

PMID:
15154468
20.

The relative abundance of mountain pine beetle fungal associates through the beetle life cycle in pine trees.

Khadempour L, LeMay V, Jack D, Bohlmann J, Breuil C.

Microb Ecol. 2012 Nov;64(4):909-17. doi: 10.1007/s00248-012-0077-z. Epub 2012 Jun 27.

PMID:
22735936

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