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Items: 1 to 20 of 144

1.

Disruption of frontal-parietal communication by ketamine, propofol, and sevoflurane.

Lee U, Ku S, Noh G, Baek S, Choi B, Mashour GA.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Jun;118(6):1264-75. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e31829103f5.

2.

Preferential inhibition of frontal-to-parietal feedback connectivity is a neurophysiologic correlate of general anesthesia in surgical patients.

Ku SW, Lee U, Noh GJ, Jun IG, Mashour GA.

PLoS One. 2011;6(10):e25155. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0025155. Epub 2011 Oct 5.

3.

Neural Correlates of Sevoflurane-induced Unconsciousness Identified by Simultaneous Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electroencephalography.

Ranft A, Golkowski D, Kiel T, Riedl V, Kohl P, Rohrer G, Pientka J, Berger S, Thul A, Maurer M, Preibisch C, Zimmer C, Mashour GA, Kochs EF, Jordan D, Ilg R.

Anesthesiology. 2016 Nov;125(5):861-872.

PMID:
27617689
4.

Effects of propofol, sevoflurane, remifentanil, and (S)-ketamine in subanesthetic concentrations on visceral and somatosensory pain-evoked potentials.

Untergehrer G, Jordan D, Eyl S, Schneider G.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Feb;118(2):308-17. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e318279fb21.

PMID:
23254146
5.

[Common mechanism: ketamine, propofol and sevoflurane].

Sitina M.

Anasthesiol Intensivmed Notfallmed Schmerzther. 2013 Nov;48(11-12):667-8. German. No abstract available.

PMID:
24490294
6.

Effects of sevoflurane and propofol on frontal electroencephalogram power and coherence.

Akeju O, Westover MB, Pavone KJ, Sampson AL, Hartnack KE, Brown EN, Purdon PL.

Anesthesiology. 2014 Nov;121(5):990-8. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0000000000000436.

7.

Reconfiguration of network hub structure after propofol-induced unconsciousness.

Lee H, Mashour GA, Noh GJ, Kim S, Lee U.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Dec;119(6):1347-59. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e3182a8ec8c.

8.

Evaluation of infusions of xylazine with ketamine or propofol to modulate recovery following sevoflurane anesthesia in horses.

Wagner AE, Mama KR, Steffey EP, Hellyer PW.

Am J Vet Res. 2012 Mar;73(3):346-52. doi: 10.2460/ajvr.73.3.346.

PMID:
22369525
9.

Simultaneous electroencephalographic and functional magnetic resonance imaging indicate impaired cortical top-down processing in association with anesthetic-induced unconsciousness.

Jordan D, Ilg R, Riedl V, Schorer A, Grimberg S, Neufang S, Omerovic A, Berger S, Untergehrer G, Preibisch C, Schulz E, Schuster T, Schröter M, Spoormaker V, Zimmer C, Hemmer B, Wohlschläger A, Kochs EF, Schneider G.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Nov;119(5):1031-42. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e3182a7ca92.

PMID:
23969561
10.

Neurophysiological correlates of sevoflurane-induced unconsciousness.

Blain-Moraes S, Tarnal V, Vanini G, Alexander A, Rosen D, Shortal B, Janke E, Mashour GA.

Anesthesiology. 2015 Feb;122(2):307-16. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0000000000000482.

11.

Neural Correlates of Wakefulness, Sleep, and General Anesthesia: An Experimental Study in Rat.

Pal D, Silverstein BH, Lee H, Mashour GA.

Anesthesiology. 2016 Nov;125(5):929-942.

PMID:
27617688
12.

Sevoflurane and propofol increase 11C-flumazenil binding to gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptors in humans.

Salmi E, Kaisti KK, Metsähonkala L, Oikonen V, Aalto S, Någren K, Hinkka S, Hietala J, Korpi ER, Scheinin H.

Anesth Analg. 2004 Nov;99(5):1420-6; table of contents.

PMID:
15502041
13.

Effects of surgical levels of propofol and sevoflurane anesthesia on cerebral blood flow in healthy subjects studied with positron emission tomography.

Kaisti KK, Metsähonkala L, Teräs M, Oikonen V, Aalto S, Jääskeläinen S, Hinkka S, Scheinin H.

Anesthesiology. 2002 Jun;96(6):1358-70.

PMID:
12170048
14.

The directionality and functional organization of frontoparietal connectivity during consciousness and anesthesia in humans.

Lee U, Kim S, Noh GJ, Choi BM, Hwang E, Mashour GA.

Conscious Cogn. 2009 Dec;18(4):1069-78. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2009.04.004. Epub 2009 May 13.

PMID:
19443244
15.

Consciousness and Complexity during Unresponsiveness Induced by Propofol, Xenon, and Ketamine.

Sarasso S, Boly M, Napolitani M, Gosseries O, Charland-Verville V, Casarotto S, Rosanova M, Casali AG, Brichant JF, Boveroux P, Rex S, Tononi G, Laureys S, Massimini M.

Curr Biol. 2015 Dec 7;25(23):3099-105. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.10.014. Epub 2015 Nov 19.

16.

The study of consciousness comes of age.

Sleigh JW.

Anesthesiology. 2013 Jun;118(6):1245-6. doi: 10.1097/ALN.0b013e318291031f. No abstract available.

PMID:
23695086
17.

[Comparison of an auditory evoked potentials index and a bispectral index versus clinical signs for determining the depth of anesthesia produced by propofol or sevoflurane].

Litvan H, Jensen EW, Maestre ML, Galán J, Campos JM, Fernández JA, Caminal P, Villar Landeira JM.

Rev Esp Anestesiol Reanim. 2000 Dec;47(10):447-57. Spanish.

PMID:
11171465
18.

Fronto-parietal connectivity is a non-static phenomenon with characteristic changes during unconsciousness.

Untergehrer G, Jordan D, Kochs EF, Ilg R, Schneider G.

PLoS One. 2014 Jan 27;9(1):e87498. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087498. eCollection 2014.

19.

Connectivity changes underlying spectral EEG changes during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.

Boly M, Moran R, Murphy M, Boveroux P, Bruno MA, Noirhomme Q, Ledoux D, Bonhomme V, Brichant JF, Tononi G, Laureys S, Friston K.

J Neurosci. 2012 May 16;32(20):7082-90. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3769-11.2012.

20.

Feedback suppression in anesthesia. Is it reversible?

Hudetz AG.

Conscious Cogn. 2009 Dec;18(4):1079-81. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2009.08.004. Epub 2009 Sep 8.

PMID:
19740677

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