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Items: 1 to 20 of 157

1.

Neurological soft signs are not "soft" in brain structure and functional networks: evidence from ALE meta-analysis.

Zhao Q, Li Z, Huang J, Yan C, Dazzan P, Pantelis C, Cheung EF, Lui SS, Chan RC.

Schizophr Bull. 2014 May;40(3):626-41. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbt063. Epub 2013 May 13.

2.

Neurological signs and morphological cerebral changes in schizophrenia: An analysis of NSS subscales in patients with first episode psychosis.

Heuser M, Thomann PA, Essig M, Bachmann S, Schröder J.

Psychiatry Res. 2011 May 31;192(2):69-76. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2010.11.009. Epub 2011 Apr 16.

PMID:
21498055
3.

Structural and functional dysconnectivity of the fronto-thalamic system in schizophrenia: a DCM-DTI study.

Wagner G, De la Cruz F, Schachtzabel C, Güllmar D, Schultz CC, Schlösser RG, Bär KJ, Koch K.

Cortex. 2015 May;66:35-45. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2015.02.004. Epub 2015 Mar 2.

PMID:
25797657
4.

Correlations of cerebello-thalamo-prefrontal structure and neurological soft signs in patients with first-episode psychosis.

Mouchet-Mages S, Rodrigo S, Cachia A, Mouaffak F, Olie JP, Meder JF, Oppenheim C, Krebs MO.

Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2011 Jun;123(6):451-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2010.01667.x. Epub 2011 Jan 11.

PMID:
21219267
5.

Neurological soft signs and brain morphology in first-episode schizophrenia.

Thomann PA, Wüstenberg T, Santos VD, Bachmann S, Essig M, Schröder J.

Psychol Med. 2009 Mar;39(3):371-9. doi: 10.1017/S0033291708003656. Epub 2008 Jun 26.

PMID:
18578894
6.

Local brain gyrification as a marker of neurological soft signs in schizophrenia.

Hirjak D, Kubera KM, Wolf RC, Thomann AK, Hell SK, Seidl U, Thomann PA.

Behav Brain Res. 2015 Oct 1;292:19-25. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2015.05.048. Epub 2015 May 29.

PMID:
26031380
7.

Neuroanatomical correlates of neurological soft signs in antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia.

Venkatasubramanian G, Jayakumar PN, Gangadhar BN, Keshavan MS.

Psychiatry Res. 2008 Dec 30;164(3):215-22. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2007.12.021.

PMID:
19019637
8.

Neurological soft signs and gray matter changes: a longitudinal analysis in first-episode schizophrenia.

Kong L, Bachmann S, Thomann PA, Essig M, Schröder J.

Schizophr Res. 2012 Jan;134(1):27-32. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2011.09.015. Epub 2011 Oct 22.

PMID:
22018942
9.

Neural network activity and neurological soft signs in healthy adults.

Thomann PA, Hirjak D, Kubera KM, Stieltjes B, Wolf RC.

Behav Brain Res. 2015 Feb 1;278:514-9. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.10.044. Epub 2014 Nov 4.

PMID:
25446752
10.

Cortex morphology in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological soft signs.

Gay O, Plaze M, Oppenheim C, Mouchet-Mages S, Gaillard R, Olié JP, Krebs MO, Cachia A.

Schizophr Bull. 2013 Jul;39(4):820-9. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbs083. Epub 2012 Aug 13.

11.

Correlation Between Brain Activation Changes and Cognitive Improvement Following Cognitive Remediation Therapy in Schizophrenia: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-analysis.

Wei YY, Wang JJ, Yan C, Li ZQ, Pan X, Cui Y, Su T, Liu TS, Tang YX.

Chin Med J (Engl). 2016 Mar 5;129(5):578-85. doi: 10.4103/0366-6999.176983.

12.

Prefrontal cortex connectivity dysfunction in performing the Fist-Edge-Palm task in patients with first-episode schizophrenia and non-psychotic first-degree relatives.

Chan RC, Huang J, Zhao Q, Wang Y, Lai YY, Hong N, Shum DH, Cheung EF, Yu X, Dazzan P.

Neuroimage Clin. 2015 Sep 18;9:411-7. doi: 10.1016/j.nicl.2015.09.008. eCollection 2015.

13.

Multimodal voxel-based meta-analysis of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in those at elevated genetic risk of developing schizophrenia.

Cooper D, Barker V, Radua J, Fusar-Poli P, Lawrie SM.

Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;221(1):69-77. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2013.07.008. Epub 2013 Nov 14.

PMID:
24239093
14.

In search of neural mechanisms of mirror neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia: resting state functional connectivity approach.

Zaytseva Y, Bendova M, Garakh Z, Tintera J, Rydlo J, Spaniel F, Horacek J.

Psychiatr Danub. 2015 Sep;27 Suppl 1:S269-72.

15.

Resting-state fMRI mapping of cerebellar functional dysconnections involving multiple large-scale networks in patients with schizophrenia.

Chen YL, Tu PC, Lee YC, Chen YS, Li CT, Su TP.

Schizophr Res. 2013 Sep;149(1-3):26-34. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2013.05.029. Epub 2013 Jun 25.

PMID:
23810119
16.

Functional connectivity profile of the human inferior frontal junction: involvement in a cognitive control network.

Sundermann B, Pfleiderer B.

BMC Neurosci. 2012 Oct 3;13:119. doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-13-119.

17.

Schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings share increased resting-state connectivity in the task-negative network but not its anticorrelated task-positive network.

Liu H, Kaneko Y, Ouyang X, Li L, Hao Y, Chen EY, Jiang T, Zhou Y, Liu Z.

Schizophr Bull. 2012 Mar;38(2):285-94. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbq074. Epub 2010 Jun 30.

18.
19.

Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity patterns of the putamen in medication-naïve children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Cao X, Cao Q, Long X, Sun L, Sui M, Zhu C, Zuo X, Zang Y, Wang Y.

Brain Res. 2009 Dec 15;1303:195-206. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2009.08.029. Epub 2009 Aug 20.

PMID:
19699190
20.

Working Memory in Unaffected Relatives of Patients With Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies.

Zhang R, Picchioni M, Allen P, Toulopoulou T.

Schizophr Bull. 2016 Jul;42(4):1068-77. doi: 10.1093/schbul/sbv221. Epub 2016 Jan 5.

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