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Items: 1 to 20 of 159

1.

Public financing of the Medicare program will make its uniform structure increasingly costly to sustain.

Baicker K, Shepard M, Skinner J.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2013 May;32(5):882-90. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1260.

2.

Additional reductions in Medicare spending growth will likely require shifting costs to beneficiaries.

Chernew ME.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2013 May;32(5):859-63. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1239.

3.

Medicare essential: an option to promote better care and curb spending growth.

Davis K, Schoen C, Guterman S.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2013 May;32(5):900-9. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1203.

4.

The Current and Projected Taxpayer Shares of US Health Costs.

Himmelstein DU, Woolhandler S.

Am J Public Health. 2016 Mar;106(3):449-52. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302997. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

5.

Three large-scale changes to the Medicare program could curb its costs but also reduce enrollment.

Eibner C, Goldman DP, Sullivan J, Garber AM.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2013 May;32(5):891-9. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2012.0147.

6.

Public Funds Account for Over 70 Percent of Health Care Spending in California.

Sorensen A, Nonzee NJ, Kominski GF.

Policy Brief UCLA Cent Health Policy Res. 2016 Aug;(PB2016-6):1-6.

PMID:
27845515
7.

Out-of-pocket health spending by poor and near-poor elderly Medicare beneficiaries.

Gross DJ, Alecxih L, Gibson MJ, Corea J, Caplan C, Brangan N.

Health Serv Res. 1999 Apr;34(1 Pt 2):241-54.

8.
9.

Paying for national health insurance--and not getting it.

Woolhandler S, Himmelstein DU.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2002 Jul-Aug;21(4):88-98.

10.

Comment on "Alternative Medicare financing sources".

Aaron HJ.

Milbank Mem Fund Q Health Soc. 1984 Spring;62(2):349-55.

PMID:
6425723
11.

Supplemental coverage associated with more rapid spending growth for Medicare beneficiaries.

Golberstein E, Walsh K, He Y, Chernew ME.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2013 May;32(5):873-81. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2012.1230.

12.

National health spending in 2013: growth slows, remains in step with the overall economy.

Hartman M, Martin AB, Lassman D, Catlin A; National Health Expenditure Accounts Team.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2015 Jan;34(1):150-60. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2014.1107. Epub 2014 Dec 3.

PMID:
25472958
13.

National health expenditure projections: modest annual growth until coverage expands and economic growth accelerates.

Keehan SP, Cuckler GA, Sisko AM, Madison AJ, Smith SD, Lizonitz JM, Poisal JA, Wolfe CJ.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2012 Jul;31(7):1600-12. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2012.0404. Epub 2012 Jun 12.

14.

The political economy of austerity and healthcare: cross-national analysis of expenditure changes in 27 European nations 1995-2011.

Reeves A, McKee M, Basu S, Stuckler D.

Health Policy. 2014 Mar;115(1):1-8. doi: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.11.008. Epub 2013 Nov 21.

15.
16.

Federal funding of health policy in Brazil: trends and challenges.

Machado CV, Lima LD, Andrade CL.

Cad Saude Publica. 2014 Jan;30(1):187-200.

17.

Medicare reform: who pays and who benefits?

McClellan M, Skinner J.

Health Aff (Millwood). 1999 Jan-Feb;18(1):48-62.

18.

A moving target: financing Medicare for the future.

Moon M, Segal M, Weiss R.

Inquiry. 2000-2001 Winter;37(4):338-47.

PMID:
11252444
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