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Items: 1 to 20 of 175

1.

Noninvasive measurements of body composition and body water via quantitative magnetic resonance, deuterium water, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in awake and sedated dogs.

Zanghi BM, Cupp CJ, Pan Y, Tissot-Favre DG, Milgram NW, Nagy TR, Dobson H.

Am J Vet Res. 2013 May;74(5):733-43. doi: 10.2460/ajvr.74.5.733.

PMID:
23627386
2.

Noninvasive measurements of body composition and body water via quantitative magnetic resonance, deuterium water, and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry in cats.

Zanghi BM, Cupp CJ, Pan Y, Tissot-Favre DG, Milgram NW, Nagy TR, Dobson H.

Am J Vet Res. 2013 May;74(5):721-32. doi: 10.2460/ajvr.74.5.721.

PMID:
23627385
4.

In vivo measurement of body composition of chickens using quantitative magnetic resonance.

Mitchell AD, Rosebrough RW, Taicher GZ, Kovner I.

Poult Sci. 2011 Aug;90(8):1712-9. doi: 10.3382/ps.2010-01156.

PMID:
21753208
5.

Validation of quantitative magnetic resonance body composition analysis for infants using piglet model.

Mitchell AD.

Pediatr Res. 2011 Apr;69(4):330-5. doi: 10.1203/PDR.0b013e31820a5b9c.

PMID:
21150693
6.

QMR: validation of an infant and children body composition instrument using piglets against chemical analysis.

Andres A, Mitchell AD, Badger TM.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Apr;34(4):775-80. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2009.284. Epub 2010 Jan 12.

PMID:
20065974
7.

Comparison of DEXA and QMR for assessing fat and lean body mass in adult rats.

Miller CN, Kauffman TG, Cooney PT, Ramseur KR, Brown LM.

Physiol Behav. 2011 Apr 18;103(1):117-21. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2010.12.004. Epub 2010 Dec 15.

8.

Comparison of body composition assessment methods in pediatric intestinal failure.

Mehta NM, Raphael B, Guteirrez IM, Quinn N, Mitchell PD, Litman HJ, Jaksic T, Duggan CP.

J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2014 Jul;59(1):99-105. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000000364.

9.

Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance to measure fat mass in infants and children.

Andres A, Gomez-Acevedo H, Badger TM.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Oct;19(10):2089-95. doi: 10.1038/oby.2011.215. Epub 2011 Jul 21.

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Quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) for longitudinal evaluation of body composition changes with two dietary regimens.

Swe Myint K, Napolitano A, Miller SR, Murgatroyd PR, Elkhawad M, Nunez DJ, Finer N.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Feb;18(2):391-6. doi: 10.1038/oby.2009.272. Epub 2009 Aug 20.

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13.

Measurement of total body water content in horses, using deuterium oxide dilution.

Andrews FM, Nadeau JA, Saabye L, Saxton AM.

Am J Vet Res. 1997 Oct;58(10):1060-4.

PMID:
9328654
14.

Use of magnetic resonance imaging to predict the body composition of pigs in vivo.

Kremer PV, Förster M, Scholz AM.

Animal. 2013 Jun;7(6):879-84. doi: 10.1017/S1751731112002340. Epub 2012 Dec 11.

PMID:
23228200
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Impact of indexing resting metabolic rate against fat-free mass determined by different body composition models.

LaForgia J, van der Ploeg GE, Withers RT, Gunn SM, Brooks AG, Chatterton BE.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Aug;58(8):1132-41.

PMID:
15054426
20.

Validation of DXA body composition estimates in obese men and women.

LaForgia J, Dollman J, Dale MJ, Withers RT, Hill AM.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Apr;17(4):821-6. doi: 10.1038/oby.2008.595. Epub 2009 Jan 8.

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