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Items: 1 to 20 of 127

1.

Foods and dietary patterns that are healthy, low-cost, and environmentally sustainable: a case study of optimization modeling for New Zealand.

Wilson N, Nghiem N, Ni Mhurchu C, Eyles H, Baker MG, Blakely T.

PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e59648. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059648. Epub 2013 Mar 27.

2.

The feasibility of achieving low-sodium intake in diets that are also nutritious, low-cost, and have familiar meal components.

Wilson N, Nghiem N, Foster RH.

PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e58539. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058539. Epub 2013 Mar 7.

3.

Healthy diets with reduced environmental impact? - The greenhouse gas emissions of various diets adhering to the Dutch food based dietary guidelines.

van de Kamp ME, van Dooren C, Hollander A, Geurts M, Brink EJ, van Rossum C, Biesbroek S, de Valk E, Toxopeus IB, Temme EHM.

Food Res Int. 2018 Feb;104:14-24. doi: 10.1016/j.foodres.2017.06.006. Epub 2017 Jun 6.

4.

Achieving dietary recommendations and reducing greenhouse gas emissions: modelling diets to minimise the change from current intakes.

Horgan GW, Perrin A, Whybrow S, Macdiarmid JI.

Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2016 Apr 7;13:46. doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0370-1.

5.

Greater accordance with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension dietary pattern is associated with lower diet-related greenhouse gas production but higher dietary costs in the United Kingdom.

Monsivais P, Scarborough P, Lloyd T, Mizdrak A, Luben R, Mulligan AA, Wareham NJ, Woodcock J.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jul;102(1):138-45. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.114.090639. Epub 2015 Apr 29.

6.

Sustainable diets for the future: Can we contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by eating a healthy diet?

Macdiarmid JI, Kyle J, Horgan GW, Loe J, Fyfe C, Johnstone A, McNeill G.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):632-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.038729. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

PMID:
22854399
7.

Emergency food storage for organisations and citizens in New Zealand: results of optimisation modelling.

Nghiem N, Carter MA, Wilson N.

N Z Med J. 2012 Dec 14;125(1367):49-60.

PMID:
23321883
8.

Towards a sustainable diet combining economic, environmental and nutritional objectives.

Donati M, Menozzi D, Zighetti C, Rosi A, Zinetti A, Scazzina F.

Appetite. 2016 Nov 1;106:48-57. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.02.151. Epub 2016 Feb 24.

PMID:
26921487
9.

Effect of feed-related farm characteristics on relative values of genetic traits in dairy cows to reduce greenhouse gas emissions along the chain.

Van Middelaar CE, Berentsen PB, Dijkstra J, Van Arendonk JA, De Boer IJ.

J Dairy Sci. 2015 Jul;98(7):4889-903. doi: 10.3168/jds.2014-8310. Epub 2015 Apr 23.

PMID:
25912865
10.

How low can dietary greenhouse gas emissions be reduced without impairing nutritional adequacy, affordability and acceptability of the diet? A modelling study to guide sustainable food choices.

Perignon M, Masset G, Ferrari G, Barré T, Vieux F, Maillot M, Amiot MJ, Darmon N.

Public Health Nutr. 2016 Oct;19(14):2662-74. doi: 10.1017/S1368980016000653. Epub 2016 Apr 6.

PMID:
27049598
11.

Greenhouse gas emissions and the Australian diet--comparing dietary recommendations with average intakes.

Hendrie GA, Ridoutt BG, Wiedmann TO, Noakes M.

Nutrients. 2014 Jan 8;6(1):289-303. doi: 10.3390/nu6010289.

12.

Trends in greenhouse gas emissions from consumption and production of animal food products - implications for long-term climate targets.

Cederberg C, Hedenus F, Wirsenius S, Sonesson U.

Animal. 2013 Feb;7(2):330-40. doi: 10.1017/S1751731112001498. Epub 2012 Jul 13.

PMID:
23031741
13.

Mapping the availability and accessibility of healthy food in rural and urban New Zealand--Te Wai o Rona: Diabetes Prevention Strategy.

Wang J, Williams M, Rush E, Crook N, Forouhi NG, Simmons D.

Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jul;13(7):1049-55. doi: 10.1017/S1368980009991595. Epub 2009 Sep 28.

PMID:
19781125
14.

Greenhouse gas emission of diets in the Netherlands and associations with food, energy and macronutrient intakes.

Temme EH, Toxopeus IB, Kramer GF, Brosens MC, Drijvers JM, Tyszler M, Ocké MC.

Public Health Nutr. 2015 Sep;18(13):2433-45. doi: 10.1017/S1368980014002821. Epub 2014 Dec 29. Review.

PMID:
25543460
15.

Which functional unit to identify sustainable foods?

Masset G, Vieux F, Darmon N.

Public Health Nutr. 2015 Sep;18(13):2488-97. doi: 10.1017/S1368980015000579. Epub 2015 Mar 25. Review.

PMID:
25805001
16.
17.

Effects of Health-Related Food Taxes and Subsidies on Mortality from Diet-Related Disease in New Zealand: An Econometric-Epidemiologic Modelling Study.

Ni Mhurchu C, Eyles H, Genc M, Scarborough P, Rayner M, Mizdrak A, Nnoaham K, Blakely T.

PLoS One. 2015 Jul 8;10(7):e0128477. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0128477. eCollection 2015.

18.

Identifying sustainable foods: the relationship between environmental impact, nutritional quality, and prices of foods representative of the French diet.

Masset G, Soler LG, Vieux F, Darmon N.

J Acad Nutr Diet. 2014 Jun;114(6):862-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2014.02.002. Epub 2014 Apr 4.

19.

Simulating the impact on health of internalising the cost of carbon in food prices combined with a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages.

Briggs ADM, Kehlbacher A, Tiffin R, Scarborough P.

BMC Public Health. 2016 Feb 3;16:107. doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-2723-8.

20.

The Impacts of Dietary Change on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Land Use, Water Use, and Health: A Systematic Review.

Aleksandrowicz L, Green R, Joy EJ, Smith P, Haines A.

PLoS One. 2016 Nov 3;11(11):e0165797. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0165797. eCollection 2016. Review.

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