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Items: 1 to 20 of 112

1.

Interspecific differences in the visual system and scanning behavior of three forest passerines that form heterospecific flocks.

Moore BA, Doppler M, Young JE, Fernández-Juricic E.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2013 Apr;199(4):263-77. doi: 10.1007/s00359-012-0790-6. Epub 2013 Feb 12.

PMID:
23400841
2.

Visual fields, eye movements, and scanning behavior of a sit-and-wait predator, the black phoebe (Sayornis nigricans).

Gall MD, Fernández-Juricic E.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2010 Jan;196(1):15-22. doi: 10.1007/s00359-009-0488-6. Epub 2009 Nov 18.

PMID:
19921207
3.

Do American goldfinches see their world like passive prey foragers? A study on visual fields, retinal topography, and sensitivity of photoreceptors.

Baumhardt PE, Moore BA, Doppler M, Fernández-Juricic E.

Brain Behav Evol. 2014;83(3):181-98. doi: 10.1159/000357750. Epub 2014 Mar 24.

PMID:
24663005
4.

Visual coverage and scanning behavior in two corvid species: American crow and Western scrub jay.

Fernández-Juricic E, O'Rourke C, Pitlik T.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2010 Dec;196(12):879-88. doi: 10.1007/s00359-010-0570-0. Epub 2010 Aug 29.

PMID:
20803204
5.

Testing the terrain hypothesis: Canada geese see their world laterally and obliquely.

Fernández-Juricic E, Moore BA, Doppler M, Freeman J, Blackwell BF, Lima SL, DeVault TL.

Brain Behav Evol. 2011;77(3):147-58. doi: 10.1159/000326053. Epub 2011 May 6.

PMID:
21546769
6.

Seasonal variation in avian auditory evoked responses to tones: a comparative analysis of Carolina chickadees, tufted titmice, and white-breasted nuthatches.

Lucas JR, Freeberg TM, Long GR, Krishnan A.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2007 Feb;193(2):201-15. Epub 2006 Oct 26.

PMID:
17066303
7.

Vision in avian emberizid foragers: maximizing both binocular vision and fronto-lateral visual acuity.

Moore BA, Pita D, Tyrrell LP, Fernández-Juricic E.

J Exp Biol. 2015 May;218(Pt 9):1347-58. doi: 10.1242/jeb.108613. Epub 2015 Mar 6.

8.

Hawk eyes I: diurnal raptors differ in visual fields and degree of eye movement.

O'Rourke CT, Hall MI, Pitlik T, Fernández-Juricic E.

PLoS One. 2010 Sep 22;5(9):e12802. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012802.

9.

Sensory basis of vigilance behavior in birds: synthesis and future prospects.

Fernández-Juricic E.

Behav Processes. 2012 Feb;89(2):143-52. doi: 10.1016/j.beproc.2011.10.006. Epub 2011 Nov 18. Review.

PMID:
22101130
10.
11.

Tubular eyes of deep-sea fishes: a comparative study of retinal topography.

Collin SP, Hoskins RV, Partridge JC.

Brain Behav Evol. 1997;50(6):335-57.

PMID:
9406644
12.

Eye shape and retinal topography in owls (Aves: Strigiformes).

Lisney TJ, Iwaniuk AN, Bandet MV, Wylie DR.

Brain Behav Evol. 2012;79(4):218-36. doi: 10.1159/000337760. Epub 2012 Jun 18.

PMID:
22722085
13.

Visual fields and eye movements in herons (Ardeidae).

Martin GR, Katzir G.

Brain Behav Evol. 1994;44(2):74-85.

PMID:
7953610
14.

Retinal ganglion cell topography of five species of ground-foraging birds.

Dolan T, Fernández-Juricic E.

Brain Behav Evol. 2010;75(2):111-21. doi: 10.1159/000305025. Epub 2010 May 27.

15.

What is binocular vision for? A birds' eye view.

Martin GR.

J Vis. 2009 Oct 14;9(11):14.1-19. doi: 10.1167/9.11.14.

PMID:
20053077
16.

Ecomorphology of eye shape and retinal topography in waterfowl (Aves: Anseriformes: Anatidae) with different foraging modes.

Lisney TJ, Stecyk K, Kolominsky J, Schmidt BK, Corfield JR, Iwaniuk AN, Wylie DR.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2013 May;199(5):385-402. doi: 10.1007/s00359-013-0802-1. Epub 2013 Mar 10.

PMID:
23475299
17.

Hawk eyes II: diurnal raptors differ in head movement strategies when scanning from perches.

O'Rourke CT, Pitlik T, Hoover M, Fernández-Juricic E.

PLoS One. 2010 Sep 22;5(9):e12169. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0012169.

18.

Does nocturnality drive binocular vision? Octodontine rodents as a case study.

Vega-Zuniga T, Medina FS, Fredes F, Zuniga C, Severín D, Palacios AG, Karten HJ, Mpodozis J.

PLoS One. 2013 Dec 31;8(12):e84199. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0084199. eCollection 2013.

19.

Topographic specializations in the retinal ganglion cell layer correlate with lateralized visual behavior, ecology, and evolution in cockatoos.

Coimbra JP, Collin SP, Hart NS.

J Comp Neurol. 2014 Oct 15;522(15):3363-85. doi: 10.1002/cne.23637. Epub 2014 Jul 17.

PMID:
24889497
20.

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