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Items: 1 to 20 of 147

1.

Why oviposit there? Fitness consequences of a gall midge choosing the plant's youngest leaf.

Ganehiarachchi GA, Anderson KM, Harmon J, Harris MO.

Environ Entomol. 2013 Feb;42(1):123-30. doi: 10.1603/EN12213.

PMID:
23339793
2.
3.

Virulent Hessian fly larvae manipulate the free amino acid content of host wheat plants.

Saltzmann KD, Giovanini MP, Zheng C, Williams CE.

J Chem Ecol. 2008 Nov;34(11):1401-10. doi: 10.1007/s10886-008-9544-x. Epub 2008 Oct 8.

PMID:
18841417
4.

Plant Photosynthetic Responses During Insect Effector-Triggered Plant Susceptibility and Immunity.

Gramig GG, Harris MO.

Environ Entomol. 2015 Jun;44(3):601-9. doi: 10.1093/ee/nvv028. Epub 2015 Mar 31.

PMID:
26313966
5.

Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) interactions with barley, rice, and wheat seedlings.

Chen MS, Liu X, Wang H, El-Bouhssini M.

J Econ Entomol. 2009 Aug;102(4):1663-72.

PMID:
19736782
6.

Fitness consequences of choosy oviposition for a time-limited butterfly.

Doak P, Kareiva P, Kingsolver J.

Ecology. 2006 Feb;87(2):395-408.

PMID:
16637365
7.

Oviposition responses by hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor, to wheats varying in surfaces waxes.

Cervantes DE, Eigenbrode SD, Ding HJ, Bosque-PĂ©rez NA.

J Chem Ecol. 2002 Jan;28(1):193-210.

PMID:
11868674
8.

Obviation of wheat resistance to the Hessian fly through systemic induced susceptibility.

Baluch SD, Ohm HW, Shukle JT, Williams CE.

J Econ Entomol. 2012 Apr;105(2):642-50.

PMID:
22606837
9.
10.

Gall midges (Hessian flies) as plant pathogens.

Stuart JJ, Chen MS, Shukle R, Harris MO.

Annu Rev Phytopathol. 2012;50:339-57. doi: 10.1146/annurev-phyto-072910-095255. Epub 2012 May 29. Review.

PMID:
22656645
11.

Study on the sensitivity of three oat varieties to the saddle gall midge, haplodiplosis margina ta (von Roser) (Diptera: cecidomyiidae).

Censier F, Chavalle S, G SM, De Proft M, Bodson B.

Commun Agric Appl Biol Sci. 2013;78(2):287-92.

PMID:
25145247
12.

A reproductive fitness cost associated with Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) virulence to wheat's H gene-mediated resistance.

Zhang H, Anderson KM, Reber J, Stuart JJ, Cambron S, Harris MO.

J Econ Entomol. 2011 Jun;104(3):1055-64.

PMID:
21735929
13.

Hessian fly larval feeding triggers enhanced polyamine levels in susceptible but not resistant wheat.

Subramanyam S, Sardesai N, Minocha SC, Zheng C, Shukle RH, Williams CE.

BMC Plant Biol. 2015 Jan 16;15:3. doi: 10.1186/s12870-014-0396-y.

14.

No fitness cost for wheat's H gene-mediated resistance to Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

Anderson KM, Kang Q, Reber J, Harris MO.

J Econ Entomol. 2011 Aug;104(4):1393-405.

PMID:
21882709
17.

Choosing between good and better: optimal oviposition drives host plant selection when parents and offspring agree on best resources.

Videla M, Valladares GR, Salvo A.

Oecologia. 2012 Jul;169(3):743-51. doi: 10.1007/s00442-011-2231-6. Epub 2012 Jan 15.

PMID:
22246471
18.

Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) attack causes a dramatic shift in carbon and nitrogen metabolism in wheat.

Zhu L, Liu X, Liu X, Jeannotte R, Reese JC, Harris M, Stuart JJ, Chen MS.

Mol Plant Microbe Interact. 2008 Jan;21(1):70-8.

19.

Deep sequencing and genome-wide analysis reveals the expansion of MicroRNA genes in the gall midge Mayetiola destructor.

Khajuria C, Williams CE, El Bouhssini M, Whitworth RJ, Richards S, Stuart JJ, Chen MS.

BMC Genomics. 2013 Mar 18;14:187. doi: 10.1186/1471-2164-14-187.

20.

Field observations of oviposition by a specialist herbivore on plant parts and plant species unsuitable as larval food.

Benda ND, Brownie C, Schal C, Gould F.

Environ Entomol. 2011 Dec;40(6):1478-86. doi: 10.1603/EN09335.

PMID:
22217764

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