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Items: 1 to 20 of 101

1.

The neural correlates of identity faking and concealment: an FMRI study.

Ding XP, Du X, Lei D, Hu CS, Fu G, Chen G.

PLoS One. 2012;7(11):e48639. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0048639. Epub 2012 Nov 7.

2.

Neural correlates of self-deception and impression-management.

Farrow TF, Burgess J, Wilkinson ID, Hunter MD.

Neuropsychologia. 2015 Jan;67:159-74. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2014.12.016. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

PMID:
25527112
3.

Specific marker of feigned memory impairment: The activation of left superior frontal gyrus.

Chen ZX, Xue L, Liang CY, Wang LL, Mei W, Zhang Q, Zhao H.

J Forensic Leg Med. 2015 Nov;36:164-71. doi: 10.1016/j.jflm.2015.09.008. Epub 2015 Sep 12.

PMID:
26479324
4.

Neural correlates of different types of deception: an fMRI investigation.

Ganis G, Kosslyn SM, Stose S, Thompson WL, Yurgelun-Todd DA.

Cereb Cortex. 2003 Aug;13(8):830-6.

PMID:
12853369
5.

Dissociable neural systems for moral judgment of anti- and pro-social lying.

Hayashi A, Abe N, Fujii T, Ito A, Ueno A, Koseki Y, Mugikura S, Takahashi S, Mori E.

Brain Res. 2014 Mar 27;1556:46-56. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2014.02.011. Epub 2014 Feb 12.

PMID:
24530270
6.

Self vs. other: neural correlates underlying agent identification based on unimodal auditory information as revealed by electrotomography (sLORETA).

Justen C, Herbert C, Werner K, Raab M.

Neuroscience. 2014 Feb 14;259:25-34. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.11.042. Epub 2013 Dec 1.

PMID:
24295635
7.

Neural correlates of feigned memory impairment are distinguishable from answering randomly and answering incorrectly: an fMRI and behavioral study.

Liang CY, Xu ZY, Mei W, Wang LL, Xue L, Lu DJ, Zhao H.

Brain Cogn. 2012 Jun;79(1):70-7. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2012.01.009. Epub 2012 Feb 22.

PMID:
22361169
8.

Brain mapping of deception and truth telling about an ecologically valid situation: functional MR imaging and polygraph investigation--initial experience.

Mohamed FB, Faro SH, Gordon NJ, Platek SM, Ahmad H, Williams JM.

Radiology. 2006 Feb;238(2):679-88.

PMID:
16436822
9.

Intentional false responding shares neural substrates with response conflict and cognitive control.

Nuñez JM, Casey BJ, Egner T, Hare T, Hirsch J.

Neuroimage. 2005 Mar;25(1):267-77. Epub 2005 Jan 13.

PMID:
15734361
10.

Sex, lies and fMRI--gender differences in neural basis of deception.

Marchewka A, Jednorog K, Falkiewicz M, Szeszkowski W, Grabowska A, Szatkowska I.

PLoS One. 2012;7(8):e43076. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043076. Epub 2012 Aug 29.

11.

Neural correlates of evaluations of lying and truth-telling in different social contexts.

Wu D, Loke IC, Xu F, Lee K.

Brain Res. 2011 May 10;1389:115-24. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2011.02.084. Epub 2011 Mar 5.

12.

Cerebral correlates of faking: evidence from a brief implicit association test on doping attitudes.

Schindler S, Wolff W, Kissler JM, Brand R.

Front Behav Neurosci. 2015 May 29;9:139. doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00139. eCollection 2015.

13.

Neural correlates of metaphor processing: the roles of figurativeness, familiarity and difficulty.

Schmidt GL, Seger CA.

Brain Cogn. 2009 Dec;71(3):375-86. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2009.06.001. Epub 2009 Jul 7.

14.

Manipulating item proportion and deception reveals crucial dissociation between behavioral, autonomic, and neural indices of concealed information.

Suchotzki K, Verschuere B, Peth J, Crombez G, Gamer M.

Hum Brain Mapp. 2015 Feb;36(2):427-39. doi: 10.1002/hbm.22637. Epub 2014 Oct 3.

PMID:
25277495
15.

Neural correlates of second-order verbal deception: a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study.

Ding XP, Sai L, Fu G, Liu J, Lee K.

Neuroimage. 2014 Feb 15;87:505-14. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.10.023. Epub 2013 Oct 23.

PMID:
24161626
16.

A replication study of the neural correlates of deception.

Kozel FA, Padgett TM, George MS.

Behav Neurosci. 2004 Aug;118(4):852-6.

PMID:
15301611
17.

Let the man choose what to do: Neural correlates of spontaneous lying and truth-telling.

Yin L, Reuter M, Weber B.

Brain Cogn. 2016 Feb;102:13-25. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2015.11.007. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

PMID:
26685089
18.

The intention to conceal activates the right prefrontal cortex: an event-related potential study.

Matsuda I, Nittono H.

Neuroreport. 2015 Mar 4;26(4):223-7. doi: 10.1097/WNR.0000000000000332.

PMID:
25646583
19.

Talking about social conflict in the MRI scanner: neural correlates of being empathized with.

Seehausen M, Kazzer P, Bajbouj M, Heekeren HR, Jacobs AM, Klann-Delius G, Menninghaus W, Prehn K.

Neuroimage. 2014 Jan 1;84:951-61. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.09.056. Epub 2013 Oct 4.

PMID:
24099849
20.

Neural correlates of the judgment of lying: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Harada T, Itakura S, Xu F, Lee K, Nakashita S, Saito DN, Sadato N.

Neurosci Res. 2009 Jan;63(1):24-34. doi: 10.1016/j.neures.2008.09.010. Epub 2008 Oct 15.

PMID:
18992288

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