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Items: 1 to 20 of 91

1.

Natural D-glucose as a biodegradable MRI contrast agent for detecting cancer.

Chan KW, McMahon MT, Kato Y, Liu G, Bulte JW, Bhujwalla ZM, Artemov D, van Zijl PC.

Magn Reson Med. 2012 Dec;68(6):1764-73. doi: 10.1002/mrm.24520. Epub 2012 Oct 16.

2.

Dynamic glucose enhanced (DGE) MRI for combined imaging of blood-brain barrier break down and increased blood volume in brain cancer.

Xu X, Chan KW, Knutsson L, Artemov D, Xu J, Liu G, Kato Y, Lal B, Laterra J, McMahon MT, van Zijl PC.

Magn Reson Med. 2015 Dec;74(6):1556-63. doi: 10.1002/mrm.25995. Epub 2015 Sep 25.

3.

Structural effect on degradability and in vivo contrast enhancement of polydisulfide Gd(III) complexes as biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents.

Zong Y, Wang X, Jeong EK, Parker DL, Lu ZR.

Magn Reson Imaging. 2009 May;27(4):503-11. doi: 10.1016/j.mri.2008.07.020. Epub 2008 Sep 23.

4.

In vivo "MRI phenotyping" reveals changes in extracellular matrix transport and vascularization that mediate VEGF-driven increase in breast cancer metastasis.

Pathak AP, McNutt S, Shah T, Wildes F, Raman V, Bhujwalla ZM.

PLoS One. 2013 May 1;8(5):e63146. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0063146. Print 2013.

5.

Molecular imaging of tumors and metastases using chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

Rivlin M, Horev J, Tsarfaty I, Navon G.

Sci Rep. 2013 Oct 25;3:3045. doi: 10.1038/srep03045.

6.

Dynamic Glucose-Enhanced (DGE) MRI: Translation to Human Scanning and First Results in Glioma Patients.

Xu X, Yadav NN, Knutsson L, Hua J, Kalyani R, Hall E, Laterra J, Blakeley J, Strowd R, Pomper M, Barker P, Chan K, Liu G, McMahon MT, Stevens RD, van Zijl PC.

Tomography. 2015 Dec;1(2):105-114.

7.

Imaging chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effects following tumor-selective acidification using lonidamine.

McVicar N, Li AX, Meakin SO, Bartha R.

NMR Biomed. 2015 May;28(5):566-75. doi: 10.1002/nbm.3287. Epub 2015 Mar 23.

PMID:
25808190
8.

[Comparison of the targeting properties of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-conjugated nanoparticles to breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells and breast fibroblasts cells].

Wang P, Shan XH, Xiong F, Gu N, Qian H, Fan Y, Wang YF.

Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi. 2013 Aug;35(8):566-71. Chinese.

PMID:
24314212
9.

Tumor characterization with dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents in mice.

Wu X, Feng Y, Jeong EK, Emerson L, Lu ZR.

Pharm Res. 2009 Sep;26(9):2202-8. doi: 10.1007/s11095-009-9935-x. Epub 2009 Jul 14.

10.

AG-013736, a novel inhibitor of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, inhibits breast cancer growth and decreases vascular permeability as detected by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

Wilmes LJ, Pallavicini MG, Fleming LM, Gibbs J, Wang D, Li KL, Partridge SC, Henry RG, Shalinsky DR, Hu-Lowe D, Park JW, McShane TM, Lu Y, Brasch RC, Hylton NM.

Magn Reson Imaging. 2007 Apr;25(3):319-27. Epub 2007 Feb 5.

PMID:
17371720
11.

Fast and Quantitative T1ρ-weighted Dynamic Glucose Enhanced MRI.

Schuenke P, Paech D, Koehler C, Windschuh J, Bachert P, Ladd ME, Schlemmer HP, Radbruch A, Zaiss M.

Sci Rep. 2017 Feb 7;7:42093. doi: 10.1038/srep42093.

12.

Contrast-enhanced in vivo imaging of breast and prostate cancer cells by MRI.

Rodriguez O, Fricke S, Chien C, Dettin L, VanMeter J, Shapiro E, Dai HN, Casimiro M, Ileva L, Dagata J, Johnson MD, Lisanti MP, Koretsky A, Albanese C.

Cell Cycle. 2006 Jan;5(1):113-9. Epub 2006 Jan 4.

PMID:
16340310
13.

Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumors: preclinical validation of parametric images.

Egeland TA, Simonsen TG, Gaustad JV, Gulliksrud K, Ellingsen C, Rofstad EK.

Radiat Res. 2009 Sep;172(3):339-47. doi: 10.1667/RR1787.1.

PMID:
19708783
14.

CEST MRI of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose on different breast cancer models.

Rivlin M, Navon G.

Magn Reson Med. 2017 May 12. doi: 10.1002/mrm.26752. [Epub ahead of print]

PMID:
28497566
15.

Using two chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for molecular imaging studies.

Ali MM, Liu G, Shah T, Flask CA, Pagel MD.

Acc Chem Res. 2009 Jul 21;42(7):915-24. doi: 10.1021/ar8002738.

PMID:
19514717
16.

MRI of High-Glucose Metabolism Tumors: a Study in Cells and Mice with 2-DG-Modified Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

Shan XH, Wang P, Xiong F, Gu N, Hu H, Qian W, Lu HY, Fan Y.

Mol Imaging Biol. 2016 Feb;18(1):24-33. doi: 10.1007/s11307-015-0874-0.

17.
18.

Natural D-glucose as a biodegradable MRI relaxation agent.

Yadav NN, Xu J, Bar-Shir A, Qin Q, Chan KW, Grgac K, Li W, McMahon MT, van Zijl PC.

Magn Reson Med. 2014 Sep;72(3):823-8. doi: 10.1002/mrm.25329. Epub 2014 Jun 27.

19.

Sensitive MRI detection of internalized T1 contrast agents using magnetization transfer contrast.

Delli Castelli D, Ferrauto G, Di Gregorio E, Terreno E, Aime S.

NMR Biomed. 2015 Dec;28(12):1663-70. doi: 10.1002/nbm.3423. Epub 2015 Oct 16.

PMID:
26474109
20.

Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Local Tumor Staging in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: A Comparison With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Grueneisen J, Nagarajah J, Buchbender C, Hoffmann O, Schaarschmidt BM, Poeppel T, Forsting M, Quick HH, Umutlu L, Kinner S.

Invest Radiol. 2015 Aug;50(8):505-13. doi: 10.1097/RLI.0000000000000197.

PMID:
26115367

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