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Items: 1 to 20 of 110

1.

Failure rate and complications of angiography and embolization for abdominal and pelvic trauma.

van der Vlies CH, Saltzherr TP, Reekers JA, Ponsen KJ, van Delden OM, Goslings JC.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 Nov;73(5):1208-12. doi: 10.1097/TA.0b013e318265ca9f.

PMID:
22922973
2.

"Blush at first sight": significance of computed tomographic and angiographic discrepancy in patients with blunt abdominal trauma.

Alarhayem AQ, Myers JG, Dent D, Lamus D, Lopera J, Liao L, Cestero R, Stewart R, Eastridge BJ.

Am J Surg. 2015 Dec;210(6):1104-10; discussion 1110-1. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2015.08.009. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

PMID:
26456683
3.

Pediatric abdominal and pelvic trauma: safety and efficacy of arterial embolization.

Vo NJ, Althoen M, Hippe DS, Prabhu SJ, Valji K, Padia SA.

J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2014 Feb;25(2):215-20. doi: 10.1016/j.jvir.2013.09.014. Epub 2013 Nov 16.

PMID:
24252774
4.

Negative catheter angiography after vascular contrast extravasations on computed tomography in blunt torso trauma: an experience review of a clinical dilemma.

Yuan KC, Wong YC, Lin BC, Kang SC, Liu EH, Hsu YP.

Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012 Jul 7;20:46. doi: 10.1186/1757-7241-20-46.

5.

Proximal splenic angioembolization does not improve outcomes in treating blunt splenic injuries compared with splenectomy: a cohort analysis.

Duchesne JC, Simmons JD, Schmieg RE Jr, McSwain NE Jr, Bellows CF.

J Trauma. 2008 Dec;65(6):1346-51; discussion 1351-3. doi: 10.1097/TA.0b013e31818c29ea.

PMID:
19077625
6.

Utilization of angiography and embolization for abdominopelvic trauma: 14 years' experience at a level I trauma center.

Roudsari BS, Psoter KJ, Padia SA, Kogut MJ, Kwan SW.

AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2014 Jun;202(6):W580-5. doi: 10.2214/AJR.13.11216.

7.

A prospective study on the safety and efficacy of angiographic embolization for pelvic and visceral injuries.

Velmahos GC, Toutouzas KG, Vassiliu P, Sarkisyan G, Chan LS, Hanks SH, Berne TV, Demetriades D.

J Trauma. 2002 Aug;53(2):303-8; discussion 308.

PMID:
12169938
8.

Angioembolization and laparotomy for patients with concomitant pelvic arterial hemorrhage and blunt abdominal trauma.

Fang JF, Shih LY, Wong YC, Lin BC, Hsu YP.

Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2011 Feb;396(2):243-50. doi: 10.1007/s00423-010-0728-9. Epub 2010 Dec 1.

PMID:
21120519
9.

Angiographic embolization for liver injuries: low mortality, high morbidity.

Mohr AM, Lavery RF, Barone A, Bahramipour P, Magnotti LJ, Osband AJ, Sifri Z, Livingston DH.

J Trauma. 2003 Dec;55(6):1077-81; discussion 1081-2.

PMID:
14676654
10.

Value of contrast-enhanced CT in detecting active hemorrhage in patients with blunt abdominal or pelvic trauma.

Shanmuganathan K, Mirvis SE, Sover ER.

AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1993 Jul;161(1):65-9.

PMID:
8517323
11.

What are the specific computed tomography scan criteria that can predict or exclude the need for renal angioembolization after high-grade renal trauma in a conservative management strategy?

Charbit J, Manzanera J, Millet I, Roustan JP, Chardon P, Taourel P, Capdevila X.

J Trauma. 2011 May;70(5):1219-27; discussion 1227-8. doi: 10.1097/TA.0b013e31821180b1.

PMID:
21610436
12.

The role of interventional radiology in abdominopelvic trauma.

Ierardi AM, Duka E, Lucchina N, Floridi C, De Martino A, Donat D, Fontana F, Carrafiello G.

Br J Radiol. 2016;89(1061):20150866. doi: 10.1259/bjr.20150866. Epub 2016 Jan 5. Review.

13.

Nonoperative management of blunt splenic injury: a 5-year experience.

Haan JM, Bochicchio GV, Kramer N, Scalea TM.

J Trauma. 2005 Mar;58(3):492-8.

PMID:
15761342
14.

Angiographic embolization in the treatment of intrahepatic arterial bleeding in patients with blunt abdominal trauma.

Kong YL, Zhang HY, He XJ, Zhao G, Liu CL, Xiao M, Zhen YY.

Hepatobiliary Pancreat Dis Int. 2014 Apr;13(2):173-8.

PMID:
24686544
15.

Transcatheter arterial embolization for hemorrhage caused by injury of the hepatic artery.

Tzeng WS, Wu RH, Chang JM, Lin CY, Koay LB, Uen YH, Tian YF, Fong Y.

J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Jul;20(7):1062-8.

PMID:
15955215
16.

Angiographic findings and embolotherapy in renal arterial trauma.

Sofocleous CT, Hinrichs C, Hubbi B, Brountzos E, Kaul S, Kannarkat G, Bahramipour P, Barone A, Contractor DG, Shah T.

Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol. 2005 Jan-Feb;28(1):39-47.

PMID:
15602636
17.

The use of angiography in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma patients.

Fenton SJ, Sandoval KN, Stevens AM, Scaife ER.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2016 Aug;81(2):261-5. doi: 10.1097/TA.0000000000001097.

PMID:
27120318
18.

Selective angiographic embolization of blunt splenic traumatic injuries in adults decreases failure rate of nonoperative management.

Bhullar IS, Frykberg ER, Siragusa D, Chesire D, Paul J, Tepas JJ 3rd, Kerwin AJ.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2012 May;72(5):1127-34. doi: 10.1097/TA.0b013e3182569849.

PMID:
22673236
19.

Major hepatic necrosis: a common complication after angioembolization for treatment of high-grade liver injuries.

Dabbs DN, Stein DM, Scalea TM.

J Trauma. 2009 Mar;66(3):621-7; discussion 627-9. doi: 10.1097/TA.0b013e31819919f2.

PMID:
19276729
20.

Delayed hemorrhagic complications in the nonoperative management of blunt splenic trauma: early screening leads to a decrease in failure rate.

Leeper WR, Leeper TJ, Ouellette D, Moffat B, Sivakumaran T, Charyk-Stewart T, Kribs S, Parry NG, Gray DK.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2014 Jun;76(6):1349-53. doi: 10.1097/TA.0000000000000228.

PMID:
24854299

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