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Items: 1 to 20 of 166

1.
2.

Limited English proficient Asian Americans: Threshold language policy and access to mental health treatment.

Snowden LR, Masland MC, Peng CJ, Wei-Mien Lou C, Wallace NT.

Soc Sci Med. 2011 Jan;72(2):230-7. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.10.027.

PMID:
21144636
3.

Association of mandated language access programming and quality of care provided by mental health agencies.

McClellan SR, Snowden L.

Psychiatr Serv. 2015 Jan 1;66(1):49-55. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201300522.

PMID:
25220026
4.

Federal civil rights policy and mental health treatment access for persons with limited English proficiency.

Snowden LR, Masland M, Guerrero R.

Am Psychol. 2007 Feb-Mar;62(2):109-17.

PMID:
17324036
6.

Access to mental health treatment by English language proficiency and race/ethnicity.

Sentell T, Shumway M, Snowden L.

J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Nov;22 Suppl 2:289-93.

7.

The legal framework for language access in healthcare settings: Title VI and beyond.

Chen AH, Youdelman MK, Brooks J.

J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Nov;22 Suppl 2:362-7. Review.

8.

Limited English proficient HMO enrollees remain vulnerable to communication barriers despite language assistance regulations.

Hadler MW, Chen X, Gonzalez E, Roby DH.

Policy Brief UCLA Cent Health Policy Res. 2013 Feb;(PB2013-1):1-8.

9.

Language barriers to health care access among Medicare beneficiaries.

Ponce NA, Ku L, Cunningham WE, Brown ER.

Inquiry. 2006 Spring;43(1):66-76.

PMID:
16838819
10.

Comparing the use of physician time and health care resources among patients speaking English, Spanish, and Russian.

Kravitz RL, Helms LJ, Azari R, Antonius D, Melnikow J.

Med Care. 2000 Jul;38(7):728-38.

PMID:
10901356
11.

Improving the provision of language services at an academic medical center: ensuring high-quality health communication for limited-English-proficient patients.

Standiford CJ, Nolan E, Harris M, Bernstein SJ.

Acad Med. 2009 Dec;84(12):1693-7. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181bf4659.

PMID:
19940574
12.

Language interpreter utilization in the emergency department setting: a clinical review.

Ramirez D, Engel KG, Tang TS.

J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 May;19(2):352-62. doi: 10.1353/hpu.0.0019. Review.

PMID:
18469408
13.

Limited English proficiency as a barrier to mental health service use: a study of Latino and Asian immigrants with psychiatric disorders.

Kim G, Aguado Loi CX, Chiriboga DA, Jang Y, Parmelee P, Allen RS.

J Psychiatr Res. 2011 Jan;45(1):104-10. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2010.04.031.

PMID:
20537658
14.
15.

Children's mental-health language access laws: state factors influence policy adoption.

Schmeida M, McNeal R.

Adm Policy Ment Health. 2013 Sep;40(5):364-70. doi: 10.1007/s10488-012-0428-6.

PMID:
22773050
16.

Qualitative evaluation of mental health services for clients with limited English proficiency.

Patel SG, Firmender WM, Snowden LR.

Int J Ment Health Syst. 2013 Dec 2;7(1):27. doi: 10.1186/1752-4458-7-27.

18.

Access barriers to mental health services for older adults from diverse populations: perspectives of leaders in mental health and aging.

Solway E, Estes CL, Goldberg S, Berry J.

J Aging Soc Policy. 2010 Oct;22(4):360-78. doi: 10.1080/08959420.2010.507650.

PMID:
20924892
19.

Who treats limited English proficient patients? Implications for linguistic access initiatives.

Seiber EE, Smith CM, Tanenbaum SJ.

Ethn Dis. 2009 Autumn;19(4):433-8.

PMID:
20073145
20.

Shared networks of interpreter services, at relatively low cost, can help providers serve patients with limited english skills.

Jacobs EA, Leos GS, Rathouz PJ, Fu P Jr.

Health Aff (Millwood). 2011 Oct;30(10):1930-8. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0667.

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