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Items: 1 to 20 of 132

1.

Integration of syndromic surveillance data into public health practice at state and local levels in North Carolina.

Samoff E, Waller A, Fleischauer A, Ising A, Davis MK, Park M, Haas SW, DiBiase L, MacDonald PD.

Public Health Rep. 2012 May-Jun;127(3):310-7.

2.

Use of syndromic surveillance at local health departments: movement toward more effective systems.

Samoff E, Fangman MT, Hakenewerth A, Ising A, Waller AE.

J Public Health Manag Pract. 2014 Jul-Aug;20(4):E25-30. doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e3182a505ac.

PMID:
24435015
3.

Local surveillance practice evaluation in North Carolina and value of new national accreditation measures.

Samoff E, Macdonald PD, Fangman MT, Waller AE.

J Public Health Manag Pract. 2013 Mar-Apr;19(2):146-52. doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e318252ee21.

PMID:
23358293
4.

We can have it all: improved surveillance outcomes and decreased personnel costs associated with electronic reportable disease surveillance, North Carolina, 2010.

Samoff E, Dibiase L, Fangman MT, Fleischauer AT, Waller AE, MacDonald PD.

Am J Public Health. 2013 Dec;103(12):2292-7. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2013.301353. Epub 2013 Oct 17.

5.

Use of syndromic surveillance data to monitor poisonings and drug overdoses in state and local public health agencies.

Ising A, Proescholdbell S, Harmon KJ, Sachdeva N, Marshall SW, Waller AE.

Inj Prev. 2016 Apr;22 Suppl 1:i43-9. doi: 10.1136/injuryprev-2015-041821.

PMID:
27044495
7.

Linking public health agencies and hospitals for improved emergency preparedness: North Carolina's public health epidemiologist program.

Markiewicz M, Bevc CA, Hegle J, Horney JA, Davies M, MacDonald PD.

BMC Public Health. 2012 Feb 23;12:141. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-141.

8.

Field investigations of emergency department syndromic surveillance signals--New York City.

Steiner-Sichel L, Greenko J, Heffernan R, Layton M, Weiss D.

MMWR Suppl. 2004 Sep 24;53:184-9.

9.

An academic/government partnership to provide technical assistance with pandemic influenza planning to local health departments in North Carolina.

Rosselli RT, Davis MK, Simeonsson K, Johnson M, Goode B, Casani J, MacDonald PD.

Public Health Rep. 2010 Nov-Dec;125 Suppl 5:92-9.

10.

Direct cost associated with the development and implementation of a local syndromic surveillance system.

Kirkwood A, Guenther E, Fleischauer AT, Gunn J, Hutwagner L, Barry MA.

J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Mar-Apr;13(2):194-9.

PMID:
17299325
11.

Assessing the roles of brokerage: an evaluation of a hospital-based Public Health epidemiologist program in North Carolina.

Bevc CA, Markiewicz ML, Hegle J, Horney JA, MacDonald PD.

J Public Health Manag Pract. 2012 Nov;18(6):577-84.

PMID:
23023283
12.

Evaluation of the implementation of the H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine in local health departments (LHDs) in North Carolina.

DiBiase LM, Davis SE, Rosselli R, Horney J.

Vaccine. 2011 May 23;29(23):3969-76. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.03.085. Epub 2011 Apr 6.

PMID:
21477677
13.

Veterinary syndromic surveillance: Current initiatives and potential for development.

Dórea FC, Sanchez J, Revie CW.

Prev Vet Med. 2011 Aug 1;101(1-2):1-17. doi: 10.1016/j.prevetmed.2011.05.004. Epub 2011 Jun 2. Review.

PMID:
21640415
14.

The epidemiology and surveillance response to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) among local health departments in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Enanoria WT, Crawley AW, Tseng W, Furnish J, Balido J, Aragón TJ.

BMC Public Health. 2013 Mar 27;13:276. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-276.

15.

Emergency department syndromic surveillance system for early detection of 5 syndromes: a pilot project in a reference teaching hospital in Genoa, Italy.

Ansaldi F, Orsi A, Altomonte F, Bertone G, Parodi V, Carloni R, Moscatelli P, Pasero E, Oreste P, Icardi G.

J Prev Med Hyg. 2008 Dec;49(4):131-5.

PMID:
19350960
16.

Support and services provided by public health regional surveillance teams to Local Health Departments in North Carolina.

Horney JA, Markiewicz M, Meyer AM, Macdonald PD.

J Public Health Manag Pract. 2011 Jan-Feb;17(1):E7-13. doi: 10.1097/PHH.0b013e3181d6f7fc.

PMID:
21135653
17.

The use of syndromic surveillance for decision-making during the H1N1 pandemic: a qualitative study.

Chu A, Savage R, Willison D, Crowcroft NS, Rosella LC, Sider D, Garay J, Gemmill I, Winter AL, Davies RF, Johnson I.

BMC Public Health. 2012 Oct 30;12:929. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-929.

18.

Information system architectures for syndromic surveillance.

Lober WB, Trigg L, Karras B.

MMWR Suppl. 2004 Sep 24;53:203-8.

19.

Regional public health preparedness teams in North Carolina: an analysis of their structural capacity and impact on services provided.

Horney JA, Markiewicz M, Meyer AM, Casani J, Hegle J, MacDonald PD.

Am J Disaster Med. 2011 Mar-Apr;6(2):107-17.

PMID:
21678820
20.

Syndromic surveillance for emerging infections in office practice using billing data.

Sloane PD, MacFarquhar JK, Sickbert-Bennett E, Mitchell CM, Akers R, Weber DJ, Howard K.

Ann Fam Med. 2006 Jul-Aug;4(4):351-8.

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