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Items: 1 to 20 of 285

1.

Competition with a host nestling for parental provisioning imposes recoverable costs on parasitic cuckoo chick's growth.

Geltsch N, Hauber ME, Anderson MG, Bán M, Moskát C.

Behav Processes. 2012 Jul;90(3):378-83. doi: 10.1016/j.beproc.2012.04.002. Epub 2012 Apr 13.

PMID:
22521709
2.

Chick loss from mixed broods reflects severe nestmate competition between an evictor brood parasite and its hosts.

Moskát C, Hauber ME.

Behav Processes. 2010 Mar;83(3):311-4. doi: 10.1016/j.beproc.2010.01.015. Epub 2010 Feb 1.

PMID:
20117189
3.

Egg eviction imposes a recoverable cost of virulence in chicks of a brood parasite.

Anderson MG, Moskát C, Bán M, Grim T, Cassey P, Hauber ME.

PLoS One. 2009 Nov 11;4(11):e7725. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0007725.

4.

Conflict between egg recognition and egg rejection decisions in common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) hosts.

Moskát C, Hauber ME.

Anim Cogn. 2007 Oct;10(4):377-86. Epub 2007 Feb 6.

PMID:
17279422
5.
6.
7.

Corticosterone levels in host and parasite nestlings: is brood parasitism a hormonal stressor?

Ibáñez-Álamo JD, De Neve L, Roldán M, Rodríguez J, Trouvé C, Chastel O, Soler M.

Horm Behav. 2012 Apr;61(4):590-7. doi: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2012.02.008. Epub 2012 Feb 15.

PMID:
22366505
8.

Constraints on host choice: why do parasitic birds rarely exploit some common potential hosts?

Grim T, Samaš P, Moskát C, Kleven O, Honza M, Moksnes A, Røskaft E, Stokke BG.

J Anim Ecol. 2011 May;80(3):508-18. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2010.01798.x. Epub 2011 Jan 18.

PMID:
21244420
9.

Escalation of a coevolutionary arms race through host rejection of brood parasitic young.

Langmore NE, Hunt S, Kilner RM.

Nature. 2003 Mar 13;422(6928):157-60.

PMID:
12634784
10.

A recognition-free mechanism for reliable rejection of brood parasites.

Anderson MG, Hauber ME.

Trends Ecol Evol. 2007 Jun;22(6):283-6. Epub 2007 Apr 6.

PMID:
17412449
11.

How selfish is a cuckoo chick?

Kilner RM, Davies NB.

Anim Behav. 1999 Oct;58(4):797-808.

PMID:
10512653
12.

The common cuckoo Cuculus canorus is not locally adapted to its reed warbler Acrocephalus scirpaceus host.

Avilés JM, Vikan JR, Fossøy F, Antonov A, Moksnes A, Røskaft E, Shykoff JA, Møller AP, Jensen H, Procházka P, Stokke BG.

J Evol Biol. 2011 Feb;24(2):314-25. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02168.x. Epub 2010 Nov 4.

13.

Horsfield's hawk-cuckoo nestlings simulate multiple gapes for begging.

Tanaka KD, Ueda K.

Science. 2005 Apr 29;308(5722):653.

15.

Rapid increase in cuckoo egg matching in a recently parasitized reed warbler population.

Avilés JM, Stokke BG, Moksnes A, Røskaft E, Asmul M, Møller AP.

J Evol Biol. 2006 Nov;19(6):1901-10.

16.
17.

Continuous variation rather than specialization in the egg phenotypes of cuckoos (Cuculus canorus) parasitizing two sympatric reed warbler species.

Drobniak SM, Dyrcz A, Sudyka J, Cichoń M.

PLoS One. 2014 Sep 2;9(9):e106650. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0106650. eCollection 2014.

19.

Sex-specific defence behaviour against brood parasitism in a host with female-only incubation.

Pozgayová M, Procházka P, Honza M.

Behav Processes. 2009 May;81(1):34-8. doi: 10.1016/j.beproc.2008.12.019. Epub 2008 Dec 30.

PMID:
19154783
20.

Visual mimicry of host nestlings by cuckoos.

Langmore NE, Stevens M, Maurer G, Heinsohn R, Hall ML, Peters A, Kilner RM.

Proc Biol Sci. 2011 Aug 22;278(1717):2455-63. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2010.2391. Epub 2011 Jan 12.

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