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Items: 1 to 20 of 153

1.

Endogenous galectin-3 controls experimental malaria in a species-specific manner.

Toscano MA, Tongren JE, de Souza JB, Liu FT, Riley EM, Rabinovich GA.

Parasite Immunol. 2012 Jul;34(7):383-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3024.2012.01366.x.

2.

Mouse models of blood-stage malaria infections: immune responses and cytokines involved in protection and pathology.

Langhorne J, Quin SJ, Sanni LA.

Chem Immunol. 2002;80:204-28. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
12058640
3.

The effect of helminth co-infection on malaria in mice: a meta-analysis.

Knowles SC.

Int J Parasitol. 2011 Aug 15;41(10):1041-51. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2011.05.009.

PMID:
21777589
4.

Outcome of primary lethal and nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii malaria infection in BALB/c and IFN-γ receptor-deficient mice following chloroquine treatment.

Ishih A, Kawakami C, Todoroki A, Hirai H, Ohori K, Kobayashi F.

Parasitol Res. 2013 Feb;112(2):773-80. doi: 10.1007/s00436-012-3197-y.

PMID:
23180129
5.

Duffy antigen is important for the lethal effect of the lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii 17XL.

Akimitsu N, Kim HS, Hamamoto H, Kamura K, Fukuma N, Arimitsu N, Ono K, Wataya Y, Torii M, Sekimizu K.

Parasitol Res. 2004 Aug;93(6):499-503.

PMID:
15278442
8.

Parasite-specific immunoglobulin isotypes during lethal and non-lethal murine malaria infections.

Smith EC, Taylor-Robinson AW.

Parasitol Res. 2003 Jan;89(1):26-33.

PMID:
12474040
10.

Transgenic mice expressing human fetal globin are protected from malaria by a novel mechanism.

Shear HL, Grinberg L, Gilman J, Fabry ME, Stamatoyannopoulos G, Goldberg DE, Nagel RL.

Blood. 1998 Oct 1;92(7):2520-6.

11.

Up- and down-modulation of liver cytochrome P450 activities and associated events in two murine malaria models.

De-Oliveira AC, Carvalho RS, Paixão FH, Tavares HS, Gueiros LS, Siqueira CM, Paumgartten FJ.

Malar J. 2010 Mar 22;9:81. doi: 10.1186/1475-2875-9-81.

12.

Expression of non-TLR pattern recognition receptors in the spleen of BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii and Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS.

Rosanas-Urgell A, Martin-Jaular L, Ricarte-Filho J, Ferrer M, Kalko S, Kimura E, Del Portillo HA.

Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2012 May;107(3):410-5.

13.
14.

Characterization of immune responses to single or mixed infections with P. yoelii 17XL and P. chabaudi AS in different strains of mice.

Chen G, Feng H, Liu J, Qi ZM, Wu Y, Guo SY, Li DM, Wang JC, Cao YM.

Parasitol Int. 2010 Sep;59(3):400-6. doi: 10.1016/j.parint.2010.05.005.

PMID:
20609420
15.
16.

Early treatment during a primary malaria infection modifies the development of cross immunity.

Legorreta-Herrera M, Ventura-Ayala ML, Licona-Chávez RN, Soto-Cruz I, Hernández-Clemente FF.

Parasite Immunol. 2004 Jan;26(1):7-17. Erratum in: Parasite Immunol. 2004 Mar;26(3):157.

17.

Distinct placental malaria pathology caused by different Plasmodium berghei lines that fail to induce cerebral malaria in the C57BL/6 mouse.

Rodrigues-Duarte L, de Moraes LV, Barboza R, Marinho CR, Franke-Fayard B, Janse CJ, Penha-Gonçalves C.

Malar J. 2012 Jul 16;11:231. doi: 10.1186/1475-2875-11-231.

19.

Development of irreversible lesions in the brain, heart and kidney following acute and chronic murine malaria infection.

Vuong PN, Richard F, Snounou G, Coquelin F, Rénia L, Gonnet F, Chabaud AG, Landau I.

Parasitology. 1999 Dec;119 ( Pt 6):543-53.

PMID:
10633915
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