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Items: 1 to 20 of 82

1.

Sol and gel states in peptide hydrogels visualized by Gd(III)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

Weerasekare M, Taraban MB, Shi X, Jeong EK, Trewhella J, Yu YB.

Biopolymers. 2011;96(6):734-43. doi: 10.1002/bip.21612. Epub 2011 Mar 7.

2.

Effects of gadolinium chelate on the evolution of the nanoscale structure in peptide hydrogels.

Taraban MB, Weerasekare M, Trewhella J, Shi X, Jeong EK, Yu YB.

Biopolymers. 2012;98(1):50-8. doi: 10.1002/bip.21689. Epub 2011 Jun 23.

3.

Gadolinium-labeled peptide dendrimers with controlled structures as potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

Luo K, Liu G, She W, Wang Q, Wang G, He B, Ai H, Gong Q, Song B, Gu Z.

Biomaterials. 2011 Nov;32(31):7951-60. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.07.006. Epub 2011 Jul 23.

PMID:
21784511
4.

Design of (Gd-DO3A)n-polydiamidopropanoyl-peptide nucleic acid-D(Cys-Ser-Lys-Cys) magnetic resonance contrast agents.

Amirkhanov NV, Dimitrov I, Opitz AW, Zhang K, Lackey JP, Cardi CA, Lai S, Wagner NJ, Thakur ML, Wickstrom E.

Biopolymers. 2008 Dec;89(12):1061-76. doi: 10.1002/bip.21059.

5.

Depiction of reperfused myocardial infarction using contrast-enhanced spin echo and gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging.

Geschwind JF, Saeed M, Wendland MF, Higgins CB.

Invest Radiol. 1998 Jul;33(7):386-92.

PMID:
9659590
6.

Spatially resolved quantification of gadolinium(III)-based magnetic resonance agents in tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry after in vivo MRI.

Aichler M, Huber K, Schilling F, Lohöfer F, Kosanke K, Meier R, Rummeny EJ, Walch A, Wildgruber M.

Angew Chem Int Ed Engl. 2015 Mar 27;54(14):4279-83. doi: 10.1002/anie.201410555. Epub 2015 Feb 16.

PMID:
25689595
7.

Magnetic field dependence of solvent proton relaxation by solute dysprosium (III) complexes.

Kellar KE, Fossheim SL, Koenig SH.

Invest Radiol. 1998 Nov;33(11):835-40.

PMID:
9818318
8.

Intraindividual in vivo comparison of gadolinium contrast agents for pharmacokinetic analysis using dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

Liang J, Sammet S, Yang X, Jia G, Takayama Y, Knopp MV.

Invest Radiol. 2010 May;45(5):233-44. doi: 10.1097/RLI.0b013e3181d54507.

PMID:
20351653
9.

Synthesis, characterization and examination of Gd[DO3A-hexylamine]-functionalized silica nanoparticles as contrast agent for MRI-applications.

Feldmann V, Engelmann J, Gottschalk S, Mayer HA.

J Colloid Interface Sci. 2012 Jan 15;366(1):70-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jcis.2011.09.053. Epub 2011 Oct 1.

PMID:
22018761
10.

Gd(III)-labeled peptide nanofibers for reporting on biomaterial localization in vivo.

Preslar AT, Parigi G, McClendon MT, Sefick SS, Moyer TJ, Haney CR, Waters EA, MacRenaris KW, Luchinat C, Stupp SI, Meade TJ.

ACS Nano. 2014 Jul 22;8(7):7325-32. doi: 10.1021/nn502393u. Epub 2014 Jun 25. Erratum in: ACS Nano. 2015 Nov 24;9(11):11502.

11.

Encapsulation of gadobutrol in AVE-based liposomal carriers for MR detectability.

Heverhagen JT, Graser A, Fahr A, Müller R, Alfke H.

Magn Reson Imaging. 2004 May;22(4):483-7.

PMID:
15120167
12.
13.

Gadolinium-conjugated PLA-PEG nanoparticles as liver targeted molecular MRI contrast agent.

Chen Z, Yu D, Liu C, Yang X, Zhang N, Ma C, Song J, Lu Z.

J Drug Target. 2011 Sep;19(8):657-65. doi: 10.3109/1061186X.2010.531727. Epub 2010 Nov 23.

PMID:
21091273
14.

Pushing the sensitivity envelope of lanthanide-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for molecular imaging applications.

Aime S, Castelli DD, Crich SG, Gianolio E, Terreno E.

Acc Chem Res. 2009 Jul 21;42(7):822-31. doi: 10.1021/ar800192p. Review.

PMID:
19534516
15.

Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanospheres with cleavable Gd(III) chelates as MRI contrast agents: synthesis, characterization, target-specificity, and renal clearance.

Vivero-Escoto JL, Taylor-Pashow KM, Huxford RC, Della Rocca J, Okoruwa C, An H, Lin W, Lin W.

Small. 2011 Dec 16;7(24):3519-28. doi: 10.1002/smll.201100521. Epub 2011 Nov 9.

16.

Multifunctional gadolinium-based dendritic macromolecules as liver targeting imaging probes.

Luo K, Liu G, He B, Wu Y, Gong Q, Song B, Ai H, Gu Z.

Biomaterials. 2011 Apr;32(10):2575-85. doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.12.049. Epub 2011 Jan 21.

PMID:
21256587
17.

Structural and relaxometric characterization of peptide aggregates containing gadolinium complexes as potential selective contrast agents in MRI.

Vaccaro M, Mangiapia G, Paduano L, Gianolio E, Accardo A, Tesauro D, Morelli G.

Chemphyschem. 2007 Dec 3;8(17):2526-38.

PMID:
17960748
18.
19.

First soluble M@C60 derivatives provide enhanced access to metallofullerenes and permit in vivo evaluation of Gd@C60[C(COOH)2]10 as a MRI contrast agent.

Bolskar RD, Benedetto AF, Husebo LO, Price RE, Jackson EF, Wallace S, Wilson LJ, Alford JM.

J Am Chem Soc. 2003 May 7;125(18):5471-8.

PMID:
12720461
20.

Application of arsenazo III in the preparation and characterization of an albumin-linked, gadolinium-based macromolecular magnetic resonance contrast agent.

Nagaraja TN, Croxen RL, Panda S, Knight RA, Keenan KA, Brown SL, Fenstermacher JD, Ewing JR.

J Neurosci Methods. 2006 Oct 30;157(2):238-45. Epub 2006 Jun 12.

PMID:
16769125

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