Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 87

1.

Pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women: tipping a sacred cow.

Sawaya GF.

Arch Intern Med. 2011 Dec 12;171(22):2054-5. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2011.567. No abstract available.

PMID:
22158577
2.

The pelvic examination as a screening tool: practices of US physicians.

Stormo AR, Hawkins NA, Cooper CP, Saraiya M.

Arch Intern Med. 2011 Dec 12;171(22):2053-4. doi: 10.1001/archinternmed.2011.575. No abstract available.

PMID:
22158576
3.

"Pelvic: deferred"-have nongynecologists been right all along?

Bump RC.

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2013 Feb;208(2):91. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2012.11.018. No abstract available.

PMID:
23351727
4.

Pelvic examination leads to changed clinical management in very few women diagnosed with asymptomatic chlamydia infection.

Lee YM, Samaranayake A, Fairley CK, Chen MY, MacFarlane F, Bradshaw CS, Hocking JS.

Sex Health. 2010 Dec;7(4):498-9. doi: 10.1071/SH09074.

PMID:
21062594
5.

Physician compliance with colon cancer screening.

Malik J, Sansone RA.

Am J Gastroenterol. 2002 Apr;97(4):1078-9. No abstract available.

PMID:
12003406
6.

In-office testing: a survey.

Wolfe S.

RN. 2000 Apr;63(4):suppl 2-6. No abstract available.

PMID:
10808933
7.

Why do patients of female physicians have higher rates of breast and cervical cancer screening?

Lurie N, Margolis KL, McGovern PG, Mink PJ, Slater JS.

J Gen Intern Med. 1997 Jan;12(1):34-43.

8.

How can rates of prostate-specific antigen screening be reduced in men aged 80 and older?

Whittle J, Zablocki CJ.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Apr;58(4):757-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02779.x. No abstract available.

PMID:
20398158
9.

Preventive service delivery by primary care physicians, Wisconsin, 1995.

Hoffman K, Remington P, Schell W.

Wis Med J. 1996 Oct;95(10):717-9. No abstract available.

PMID:
8909192
11.

Unneeded pelvic exams in women seeking birth control.

Potera C.

Am J Nurs. 2011 Mar;111(3):17. doi: 10.1097/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000395226.64552.63. No abstract available.

PMID:
21346453
12.

Cervical cancer screening practices among general practitioners in Lagos Nigeria.

Anorlu RI, Ribiu KA, Abudu OO, Ola ER.

J Obstet Gynaecol. 2007 Feb;27(2):181-4.

PMID:
17454471
13.

[The diagnostic value of medical examinations and their use: external validity].

Ben Hamida A, M'Rad S, Ben Hamida L, H'Sairi M, Zouari B, Nacef T.

Tunis Med. 1992 Jun-Jul;70(6-7):321-4. French. No abstract available.

PMID:
1448854
14.

Missed cancer screening opportunities among older women: A provider survey.

Gulitz E, Bustillo-Hernandez M, Kent EB.

Cancer Pract. 1998 Nov-Dec;6(6):325-32.

PMID:
9824423
15.

Current status of screening colonoscopy in Europe and in the United States.

Pox C, Schmiegel W, Classen M.

Endoscopy. 2007 Feb;39(2):168-73. No abstract available.

PMID:
17327977
16.

[The screening for asymptomatic vascular disease and risk factors in high risk patients: current practice].

Simons PC, van der Graaf Y, Banga JD, Eikelboom BC, Algra A.

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1998 May 9;142(19):1096-9. Dutch.

PMID:
9623227
17.

Risk prevalence and screening for cancer by general practitioners.

Heywood A, Sanson-Fisher R, Ring I, Mudge P.

Prev Med. 1994 Mar;23(2):152-9.

PMID:
8047520
18.

Factors prompting men subsequently diagnosed with chlamydia to use a sexual health service.

Brandenburger Y, Currie MJ, Bowden FJ.

Sex Health. 2007 Mar;4(1):77-8. No abstract available.

PMID:
17382044
19.

Skin cancer screening by Australian family physicians: variation with physician beliefs and geographic locality.

Sladden MJ, Ward JE, Del Mar CB, Lowe JB.

Am J Prev Med. 1999 Aug;17(2):142-6.

PMID:
10490058
20.

Missed opportunities for chlamydia screening of young women in the United States.

Hoover K, Tao G.

Obstet Gynecol. 2008 May;111(5):1097-102. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31816bbe9b.

PMID:
18448741

Supplemental Content

Support Center