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Items: 1 to 20 of 209

1.

Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1 A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu-opioid receptor binding potential in smokers.

Ray R, Ruparel K, Newberg A, Wileyto EP, Loughead JW, Divgi C, Blendy JA, Logan J, Zubieta JK, Lerman C.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 May 31;108(22):9268-73. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1018699108. Epub 2011 May 16.

2.

Nicotine-specific and non-specific effects of cigarette smoking on endogenous opioid mechanisms.

Nuechterlein EB, Ni L, Domino EF, Zubieta JK.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Aug 1;69:69-77. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2016.04.006. Epub 2016 Apr 17.

3.

Regional brain [(11)C]carfentanil binding following tobacco smoking.

Domino EF, Hirasawa-Fujita M, Ni L, Guthrie SK, Zubieta JK.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Jun 3;59:100-4. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2015.01.007. Epub 2015 Jan 15.

4.

Tobacco smoking produces greater striatal dopamine release in G-allele carriers with mu opioid receptor A118G polymorphism.

Domino EF, Evans CL, Ni L, Guthrie SK, Koeppe RA, Zubieta JK.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2012 Aug 7;38(2):236-40. doi: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2012.04.003. Epub 2012 Apr 10.

PMID:
22516252
5.

Association of OPRM1 A118G variant with the relative reinforcing value of nicotine.

Ray R, Jepson C, Patterson F, Strasser A, Rukstalis M, Perkins K, Lynch KG, O'Malley S, Berrettini WH, Lerman C.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2006 Oct;188(3):355-63. Epub 2006 Sep 8.

PMID:
16960700
6.

Mu Opioid Receptor Binding Correlates with Nicotine Dependence and Reward in Smokers.

Kuwabara H, Heishman SJ, Brasic JR, Contoreggi C, Cascella N, Mackowick KM, Taylor R, Rousset O, Willis W, Huestis MA, Concheiro M, Wand G, Wong DF, Volkow ND.

PLoS One. 2014 Dec 10;9(12):e113694. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113694. eCollection 2014.

7.

Positron emission tomography imaging of mu- and delta-opioid receptor binding in alcohol-dependent and healthy control subjects.

Weerts EM, Wand GS, Kuwabara H, Munro CA, Dannals RF, Hilton J, Frost JJ, McCaul ME.

Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Dec;35(12):2162-73. doi: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01565.x. Epub 2011 Jun 20.

8.

Effects of the Mu opioid receptor polymorphism (OPRM1 A118G) on pain regulation, placebo effects and associated personality trait measures.

Peciña M, Love T, Stohler CS, Goldman D, Zubieta JK.

Neuropsychopharmacology. 2015 Mar;40(4):957-65. doi: 10.1038/npp.2014.272. Epub 2014 Oct 13.

9.

Smoking modulation of mu-opioid and dopamine D2 receptor-mediated neurotransmission in humans.

Scott DJ, Domino EF, Heitzeg MM, Koeppe RA, Ni L, Guthrie S, Zubieta JK.

Neuropsychopharmacology. 2007 Feb;32(2):450-7. Epub 2006 Nov 8.

10.

μ-Opioid receptor availability in the amygdala is associated with smoking for negative affect relief.

Falcone M, Gold AB, Wileyto EP, Ray R, Ruparel K, Newberg A, Dubroff J, Logan J, Zubieta JK, Blendy JA, Lerman C.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2012 Aug;222(4):701-8. doi: 10.1007/s00213-012-2673-5. Epub 2012 Mar 3.

11.

Association of smoking with μ-opioid receptor availability before and during naltrexone blockade in alcohol-dependent subjects.

Weerts EM, Wand GS, Kuwabara H, Xu X, Frost JJ, Wong DF, McCaul ME.

Addict Biol. 2014 Jul;19(4):733-42. doi: 10.1111/adb.12022. Epub 2012 Dec 18.

12.

Increased mesolimbic cue-reactivity in carriers of the mu-opioid-receptor gene OPRM1 A118G polymorphism predicts drinking outcome: a functional imaging study in alcohol dependent subjects.

Bach P, Vollsta Dt-Klein S, Kirsch M, Hoffmann S, Jorde A, Frank J, Charlet K, Beck A, Heinz A, Walter H, Sommer WH, Spanagel R, Rietschel M, Kiefer F.

Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2015 Aug;25(8):1128-35. doi: 10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.04.013. Epub 2015 Apr 18.

PMID:
25937240
13.

Genetic Variation of the Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1) and Dopamine D2 Receptor (DRD2) is Related to Smoking Differences in Patients with Schizophrenia but not Bipolar Disorder.

Hirasawa-Fujita M, Bly MJ, Ellingrod VL, Dalack GW, Domino EF.

Clin Schizophr Relat Psychoses. Spring 2017;11(1):39-48. doi: 10.3371/1935-1232-11.1.39.

14.

Reduced expression of the μ opioid receptor in some, but not all, brain regions in mice with OPRM1 A112G.

Wang YJ, Huang P, Ung A, Blendy JA, Liu-Chen LY.

Neuroscience. 2012 Mar 15;205:178-84. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2011.12.033. Epub 2012 Jan 3.

15.

Parental smoke exposure and the development of nicotine craving in adolescent novice smokers: the roles of DRD2, DRD4, and OPRM1 genotypes.

Kleinjan M, Engels RC, DiFranza JR.

BMC Pulm Med. 2015 Oct 8;15:115. doi: 10.1186/s12890-015-0114-z.

16.

Genotyping the Mu-opioid receptor A118G polymorphism using the real-time amplification refractory mutation system: allele frequency distribution among Brazilians.

Daher M, Costa FM, Neves FA.

Pain Pract. 2013 Nov;13(8):614-20. doi: 10.1111/papr.12042. Epub 2013 Feb 14.

PMID:
23405975
17.

Influence of OPRM1 Asn40Asp variant (A118G) on [11C]carfentanil binding potential: preliminary findings in human subjects.

Weerts EM, McCaul ME, Kuwabara H, Yang X, Xu X, Dannals RF, Frost JJ, Wong DF, Wand GS.

Int J Neuropsychopharmacol. 2013 Feb;16(1):47-53. doi: 10.1017/S146114571200017X. Epub 2012 Mar 8.

PMID:
22397905
18.

Gene-gene interaction of μ-opioid receptor and GluR5 kainate receptor subunit is associated with smoking behavior in a Greek population: presence of a dose allele effect.

Misailidis G, Ragia G, Ivanova DD, Tavridou A, Manolopoulos VG.

Drug Metab Pers Ther. 2015 Jun;30(2):129-35. doi: 10.1515/dmdi-2015-0005.

PMID:
25941919
19.

Brain region- and sex-specific alterations in DAMGO-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγS binding in mice with Oprm1 A112G.

Wang YJ, Huang P, Blendy JA, Liu-Chen LY.

Addict Biol. 2014 May;19(3):354-61. doi: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00484.x. Epub 2012 Aug 2.

20.

Imaging brain mu-opioid receptors in abstinent cocaine users: time course and relation to cocaine craving.

Gorelick DA, Kim YK, Bencherif B, Boyd SJ, Nelson R, Copersino M, Endres CJ, Dannals RF, Frost JJ.

Biol Psychiatry. 2005 Jun 15;57(12):1573-82.

PMID:
15953495

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