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Items: 1 to 20 of 133

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Discrete amino acid sequences of the alpha 1-adrenergic receptor determine the selectivity of coupling to phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis.

Cotecchia S, Ostrowski J, Kjelsberg MA, Caron MG, Lefkowitz RJ.

J Biol Chem. 1992 Jan 25;267(3):1633-9.

5.

Activation of Gi protein by peptide structures of the muscarinic M2 receptor second intracellular loop.

McClue SJ, Baron BM, Harris BA.

Eur J Pharmacol. 1994 Apr 15;267(2):185-93.

PMID:
8050479
6.

Reconstitutively active G protein-coupled receptors purified from baculovirus-infected insect cells.

Parker EM, Kameyama K, Higashijima T, Ross EM.

J Biol Chem. 1991 Jan 5;266(1):519-27.

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Inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor signaling by expression of cytoplasmic domains of the receptor.

Hawes BE, Luttrell LM, Exum ST, Lefkowitz RJ.

J Biol Chem. 1994 Jun 3;269(22):15776-85.

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Hydrophobic amino acid in the i2 loop plays a key role in receptor-G protein coupling.

Moro O, Lameh J, Högger P, Sadée W.

J Biol Chem. 1993 Oct 25;268(30):22273-6.

12.

A transfected m1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor stimulates adenylate cyclase via phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis.

Felder CC, Kanterman RY, Ma AL, Axelrod J.

J Biol Chem. 1989 Dec 5;264(34):20356-62.

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Dual signaling potential is common among Gs-coupled receptors and dependent on receptor density.

Zhu X, Gilbert S, Birnbaumer M, Birnbaumer L.

Mol Pharmacol. 1994 Sep;46(3):460-9.

PMID:
7935326

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