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Items: 1 to 20 of 66

1.

Time to think outside the (genetic) box.

Issa JP, Garber JE.

Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2011 Jan;4(1):6-8. doi: 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-10-0348.

2.

[Clinical and molecular diagnosis of inherited breast-ovarian cancer].

Chompret A.

J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris). 2003 Apr;32(2):101-19. Review. French.

3.

Counseling the at risk patient in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 Era.

Barnes-Kedar IM, Plon SE.

Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am. 2002 Jun;29(2):341-66, vii. Review.

PMID:
12108833
4.
5.

The prevention of hereditary breast cancer.

Rodriquez E, Domchek SM.

Semin Oncol. 2007 Oct;34(5):401-5. Review.

PMID:
17920894
6.

Coinheritance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations with Fanconi anemia and Bloom syndrome mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish population: possible role in risk modification for cancer development.

Koren-Michowitz M, Friedman E, Gershoni-Baruch R, Brok-Simoni F, Patael Y, Rechavi G, Amariglio N.

Am J Hematol. 2005 Mar;78(3):203-6.

7.

Analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Brazilian breast cancer patients with positive family history.

Dufloth RM, Carvalho S, Heinrich JK, Shinzato JY, dos Santos CC, Zeferino LC, Schmitt F.

Sao Paulo Med J. 2005 Jul 7;123(4):192-7.

8.

Considerations in genetic counseling for inherited breast cancer predisposition.

Robson ME, Offit K.

Semin Radiat Oncol. 2002 Oct;12(4):362-70.

PMID:
12382194
9.

Diagnostic imaging in the clinical management of patients at high risk for breast cancer.

Pastore G, Canadè A, Costantini M, Terribile D, Nardone L, Belli P.

Rays. 2002 Oct-Dec;27(4):295-8.

PMID:
12703481
10.

BRCA1 gene mutations may explain more than 80% of excess number of ovarian cancer cases after breast cancer - a population based study from the Western Sweden Health Care region.

Einbeigi Z, Enerbäck C, Wallgren A, Nordling M, Karlsson P.

Acta Oncol. 2010 Apr;49(3):361-7. doi: 10.3109/02841860903521095.

PMID:
20151938
11.

Breast cancer genetics in African Americans.

Olopade OI, Fackenthal JD, Dunston G, Tainsky MA, Collins F, Whitfield-Broome C.

Cancer. 2003 Jan 1;97(1 Suppl):236-45. Review.

12.

Childhood cancer in families with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations ascertained at a high-risk breast cancer clinic.

Brooks GA, Stopfer JE, Erlichman J, Davidson R, Nathanson KL, Domchek SM.

Cancer Biol Ther. 2006 Sep;5(9):1098-102. Epub 2006 Sep 11.

PMID:
16931905
13.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic test in high risk patients and families: counselling and management.

Marchina E, Fontana MG, Speziani M, Salvi A, Ricca G, Di Lorenzo D, Gervasi M, Caimi L, Barlati S.

Oncol Rep. 2010 Dec;24(6):1661-7.

PMID:
21042765
14.

Breast and ovarian cancer risks due to inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

King MC, Marks JH, Mandell JB; New York Breast Cancer Study Group.

Science. 2003 Oct 24;302(5645):643-6.

15.

Clinical practice. Management of an inherited predisposition to breast cancer.

Robson M, Offit K.

N Engl J Med. 2007 Jul 12;357(2):154-62. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
17625127
16.

The prevalence of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations among Ashkenazi Jews.

Hartge P, Struewing JP, Wacholder S, Brody LC, Tucker MA.

Am J Hum Genet. 1999 Apr;64(4):963-70.

17.

Pitfalls and caveats in BRCA sequencing.

Bellosillo B, Tusquets I.

Ultrastruct Pathol. 2006 May-Jun;30(3):229-35. Review.

PMID:
16825125
18.

[Inherited breast and ovarian cancers].

Gerdes AM, Ejlertsen B.

Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Jun 12;168(24):2367-9. Danish.

PMID:
16822422
19.

Inherited predisposition and breast cancer: modifiers of BRCA1/2-associated breast cancer risk.

Rebbeck TR.

Environ Mol Mutagen. 2002;39(2-3):228-34. Review.

PMID:
11921193

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